UNITAID’s Request for Suggestions on Breaking Down IP Barriers Ignores Harmful Patent Delay

Last month, global health initiative UNITAID launched an appeal for suggestions on breaking down barriers that frustrate the progress of public health. UNITAID is a multilateral partnership hosted by the World Health Organization whose mission is to develop systematic approaches to identifying challenges in the treatment of devastating diseases such as HIV, TB, and malaria. … Continue reading UNITAID’s Request for Suggestions on Breaking Down IP Barriers Ignores Harmful Patent Delay

Criminal Copyright Infringement is Crime of “Moral Turpitude”

Cross-posted from the Law Theories blog. This past Friday, the Board of Immigration Appeals held that criminal copyright infringement constitutes a “crime involving moral turpitude” under immigration law. The Board reasoned that criminal copyright infringement is inherently immoral because it involves the willful theft of property and causes harm to both the copyright owner and … Continue reading Criminal Copyright Infringement is Crime of “Moral Turpitude”

Federal Circuit Again Finds Computer-Implemented Invention Patent Eligible

In Tuesday’s McRO v. Bandai decision, the Federal Circuit has once again reversed a district court’s determination that a computer-implemented invention (aka “software patent”) was not patent eligible under Section 101 of the Patent Act. This continues the Federal Circuit’s recent trend of clarifying the Supreme Court’s two-step patent-eligibility test under Mayo and Alice. The … Continue reading Federal Circuit Again Finds Computer-Implemented Invention Patent Eligible

European Union Draws a Line on Infringing Hyperlinks

Last week, the European Court of Justice—the judicial authority of the European Union—issued an anticipated decision in the Sanoma hyperlinking case, declaring that commercial linking with knowledge of unauthorized content constitutes copyright infringement. The opinion comes after years of similar cases in Europe stirred debate over whether linking to pirated works was a ‘communication to the … Continue reading European Union Draws a Line on Infringing Hyperlinks

Scalia Law Alums Help Arts & Entertainment Advocacy Clinic Draft Influential Amicus Brief

Last spring, the Arts & Entertainment Advocacy Clinic at Scalia Law School filed an amicus brief on behalf of intellectual property law scholars in the Fox News v. TVEyes copyright infringement case. Assisting the students on the project was practicing IP attorney and Scalia Law alum Jennifer Atkins, who volunteered her time—and the time of … Continue reading Scalia Law Alums Help Arts & Entertainment Advocacy Clinic Draft Influential Amicus Brief

Center for the Protection of Intellectual Property