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CPIP Scholars File Amicus Brief Urging Consideration of Claimed Inventions as a Whole

Last week, CPIP Senior Scholar Adam Mossoff and I filed an amicus brief on behalf of 15 law professors, including CPIP’s Devlin Hartline, Chris Holman, Sean O’Connor, Kristen Osenga, and Mark Schultz. We urge the Supreme Court to grant certiorari in TDE Petroleum v. AKM Enterprise and reaffirm that any analysis of an invention must be of the claimed invention … Continue reading “CPIP Scholars File Amicus Brief Urging Consideration of Claimed Inventions as a Whole”

Can Copyright Help Fight Censorship in China?

Free expression in China has long been a fraught concern for the entertainment industry. Last year, Chinese regulators forbade local companies from working on foreign films that could “harm national dignity and interest of China, cause social instability, or hurt the national feeling,” striking at the rapidly expanding Chinese post-production industry for Hollywood films. A … Continue reading “Can Copyright Help Fight Censorship in China?”

IPO Publishes Analysis of Recently Released Legislative Proposal

Last week, the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) released a proposed revision to the section of the Patent Act that defines the subject matter eligible for patenting.  I discussed the importance of the proposal, noting that there have been several calls for legislative solutions to overly restrictive understanding of what inventions are eligible for patents. … Continue reading “IPO Publishes Analysis of Recently Released Legislative Proposal”

SONA and Songwriters Fight DOJ’s Misguided 100% Licensing Rule

Things are heating up in the lawsuit filed by Songwriters of North America and three of its members (SONA) challenging the new gloss of the Department of Justice (DOJ) on the 75-year-old consent decrees that govern the licensing practices of ASCAP and BMI, the two largest performance rights organizations (PROs). SONA sued the DOJ on … Continue reading “SONA and Songwriters Fight DOJ’s Misguided 100% Licensing Rule”

CPIP Founders File Amicus Brief on Behalf of 11 Law Professors in Converse v. ITC

CPIP Founders Adam Mossoff & Mark Schultz filed an amicus brief today on behalf of 11 law professors in Converse v. International Trade Commission, a trademark case currently before the Federal Circuit. In late-2014, Converse filed a complaint with the International Trade Commission alleging that more than thirty companies, including Skechers, Walmart, New Balance, and … Continue reading “CPIP Founders File Amicus Brief on Behalf of 11 Law Professors in Converse v. ITC”

IPO Proposes Legislative Solution to the Morass of Patent Eligibility

On January 31, the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) released a proposed revision to the section of the Patent Act that defines the subject matter eligible for patenting. IPO’s proposed text for an amended 35 U.S.C. § 101 can be downloaded here. The proposal returns patent law to the long established practice of analyzing the … Continue reading “IPO Proposes Legislative Solution to the Morass of Patent Eligibility”

IP Scholars Explain Why We Shouldn’t Use SurveyMonkey to Select Our Next Register of Copyrights

In a letter submitted to House Judiciary Committee today, nine IP scholars (organized by CPIP’s Sandra Aistars) express their support for the Committee’s proposal to modernize the Copyright Office. The letter identifies three major challenges facing the Copyright Office, including “(1) insufficient funds, staff, and infrastructure to efficiently perform its core functions; (2) operational impediments … Continue reading “IP Scholars Explain Why We Shouldn’t Use SurveyMonkey to Select Our Next Register of Copyrights”

How IP Helps Individuals

This is the second in a series of posts summarizing CPIP’s 2016 Fall Conference, “Intellectual Property and Global Prosperity.” The Conference was held at Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University on October 6-7, 2016. Videos of the conference panels and keynote address, as well as other materials, are available on the conference website. The … Continue reading “How IP Helps Individuals”

Intellectual Property Backgrounds of President Trump’s Potential Supreme Court Nominees

By Andrew Baluch[1] & Devlin Hartline President Donald Trump will soon announce his nominee to fill the vacancy left at the Supreme Court by late Associate Justice Antonin Scalia. On September 23, 2016, the Trump campaign revealed that there are twenty-one candidates under consideration for the nomination. Below is a summary of the intellectual property … Continue reading “Intellectual Property Backgrounds of President Trump’s Potential Supreme Court Nominees”

Trading Technologies v. CQG: Federal Circuit Gets One Right On Software Patents

The Federal Circuit issued another important opinion yesterday affirming that software is a patentable invention in the United States. In Trading Technologies Int’l, Inc. v. CQG, Inc., the court determined that a graphical user interface (GUI) for a commodities trading platform was patent eligible. Ten law professors, including CPIP Senior Scholars and others, filed an … Continue reading “Trading Technologies v. CQG: Federal Circuit Gets One Right On Software Patents”