Professor Tabrez Ebrahim on Artificial Intelligence Inventions

The following post comes from Associate Professor of Law Tabrez Ebrahim of California Western School of Law in San Diego, California. By Tabrez Ebrahim Artificial intelligence (AI) is a major concern to the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), for patent theory and policy, and for society. The USPTO requested comments from stakeholders about … Continue reading “Professor Tabrez Ebrahim on Artificial Intelligence Inventions”

CPIP’s Sandra Aistars and Scalia Law Arts & Entertainment Advocacy Clinic Co-Host Virtual Copyright Event on Arts and the Pandemic

The following post comes from Chris Wolfsen, a recent graduate of Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Chris Wolfsen On October 27, 2020, CPIP Director of Copyright Research and Policy Sandra Aistars and students from her Arts & Entertainment Advocacy Clinic at Scalia Law School co-hosted a virtual event with Washington Area … Continue reading “CPIP’s Sandra Aistars and Scalia Law Arts & Entertainment Advocacy Clinic Co-Host Virtual Copyright Event on Arts and the Pandemic”

Rethinking § 101: Professor Talha Syed Takes a Different Look at Subject Matter Eligibility

The following post comes from Colin Kreutzer, a 2E at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Colin Kreutzer When most people think of patentability requirements, they think of whether an invention has been “done before.” Novelty and non-obviousness under 35 U.S.C. §§ 102 and 103 are certainly key hurdles to obtaining a … Continue reading “Rethinking § 101: Professor Talha Syed Takes a Different Look at Subject Matter Eligibility”

Christa Laser on Patent Law’s Equitable Defenses

The following post comes from Wade Cribbs, a 2L at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Wade Cribbs In patent law, equitable defenses can play an essential role in multi-million-dollar patent infringement cases. Unclean hands, misuse, or estoppel can render a potential verdict unenforceable. CPIP Edison Fellow and Assistant Professor of Law … Continue reading “Christa Laser on Patent Law’s Equitable Defenses”

CPIP Roundup – October 30, 2020

Greetings from CPIP Executive Director Sean O’Connor With the end of the crazy year of 2020 coming into view, we here at CPIP are striving for a strong finish and already looking forward to meeting 2021 as prepared as anyone can be. Our thoughts are with all of CPIP’s friends, and I’m glad to pass … Continue reading “CPIP Roundup – October 30, 2020”

House Judiciary Committee Hearing Reacts to Copyright Office Report on Efficacy of Section 512

The following post comes from Liz Velander, a recent graduate of Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Liz Velander In late September, the House Judiciary Committee held a hearing entitled Copyright and the Internet in 2020: Reactions to the Copyright Office’s Report on the Efficacy of 17 U.S.C. 512 After Two Decades. … Continue reading “House Judiciary Committee Hearing Reacts to Copyright Office Report on Efficacy of Section 512”

The Changing Nature of Sound Recording Rights

The following post comes from Meghan Carlin, who is in her second year at Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto, Ontario. In addition to her work with the IPilogue, Meghan is a Fellow with the Innovation Clinic and is Co-President of the Osgoode Entertainment and Sports Law Association. This post first appeared at IPilogue. By … Continue reading “The Changing Nature of Sound Recording Rights”

CPIP 2020 Fall Conference: Day Two Recap

The following post comes from Wade Cribbs, a 2L at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. This is the second of two posts (see day one recap) summarizing our two-day 5G at the Nexus of IP, Antitrust, and Technology Leadership conference that was held online from George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School … Continue reading “CPIP 2020 Fall Conference: Day Two Recap”

CPIP 2020 Fall Conference: Day One Recap

The following post comes from Terence Yen, a 4E at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. This is the first of two posts (see day two recap) summarizing our two-day 5G at the Nexus of IP, Antitrust, and Technology Leadership conference that was held online from George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School … Continue reading “CPIP 2020 Fall Conference: Day One Recap”

Google v. Oracle at the Supreme Court: Copyrightability, Fair Use, and Standard of Review

The following post comes from Chris Wolfsen, a recent graduate of Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Chris Wolfsen Grocery store shelves, QWERTY keyboards, and restaurant menus. These are just three of the analogies that Supreme Court justices used to grapple with the complex issues in the long-awaited Google v. Oracle oral … Continue reading “Google v. Oracle at the Supreme Court: Copyrightability, Fair Use, and Standard of Review”