CPIP Announces Leadership Transitions

ARLINGTON, Virginia – August 22, 2018 – The Center for the Protection of Intellectual Property (CPIP) announced today that Matthew Barblan, CPIP’s Executive Director, will leave the center this month to join the Association of American Publishers (AAP) as Vice President, Public Policy. “It has been an amazing journey working with such wonderful colleagues to … Continue reading “CPIP Announces Leadership Transitions”

Study Finds IEEE’s 2015 Patent Policy Sowing Uncertainty and Slowing Innovation

By Kevin Madigan & Adam Mossoff As the world prepares for the game-changing transition to 5G wireless systems, the high-tech industry must continue to efficiently develop and implement technologies and networks that work together across different platforms and devices. Few people are aware of how this happens, because it occurs solely between the companies who … Continue reading “Study Finds IEEE’s 2015 Patent Policy Sowing Uncertainty and Slowing Innovation”

The Value of Public Data: Update to “Turning Gold to Lead”

By Kevin Madigan & Adam Mossoff A key value in the empirical work done in the social sciences and in the STEM fields is that data is made public and available for review, testing, and confirmation. Humans are neither infallible nor omniscient, and thus this standard practice in empirical research has evolved as a way to … Continue reading “The Value of Public Data: Update to “Turning Gold to Lead””

Despite Professors’ Misleading Rhetoric, CLASSICS is a Big Win for Everyone

By Matthew Barblan America’s music industry is experiencing a historic moment. For the first time ever, stakeholders from across the industry have set aside their differences and come together to find a way to modernize our music licensing system. And what’s more, these diverse stakeholders—ranging from artists and record labels, to songwriters and music publishers, … Continue reading “Despite Professors’ Misleading Rhetoric, CLASSICS is a Big Win for Everyone”

CPIP Scholars Examine the Flaws in the Term “Evergreening”

In their new paper, Evergreening of Pharmaceutical Exclusivity: Sorting Fact from Misunderstanding and Fiction, Professors Kristina Acri née Lybecker and Mark Schultz, along with CPIP John F. Witherspoon Legal Fellow David Lund, analyze how the term “evergreening” is used in the context of pharmaceuticals. After sorting through the vagaries and rhetorical excesses that restrict meaningful … Continue reading “CPIP Scholars Examine the Flaws in the Term “Evergreening””

Statement of Professor Adam Mossoff on Oil States v. Greene’s Energy

The statement below is from Professor Adam Mossoff, whose law review articles (here and here) were heavily cited in Justice Gorsuch’s dissent (joined by Chief Justice Roberts) in today’s opinion in Oil States v. Greene’s Energy. Adam Mossoff Professor of Law Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University For the first time, the Supreme Court … Continue reading “Statement of Professor Adam Mossoff on Oil States v. Greene’s Energy”

CLASSICS Act Provides Long Overdue Recognition for Legacy Recording Artists

By Matthew Barblan & Kevin Madigan One of the oddities of US copyright law is that sound recordings—the way that our favorite songs are captured on media so that we can listen to them over and over again—were not protected under federal law until the early 1970s. Unfortunately, when the federal Copyright Act was finally … Continue reading “CLASSICS Act Provides Long Overdue Recognition for Legacy Recording Artists”

Innovate4Health: SaTo Pan Delivers a Sustainable Solution to the Sanitation Crisis in Developing Nations

This post is one of a series in the #Innovate4Health policy research initiative. By Michael O’Keefe Poor sanitation poses an ongoing threat to the health and well-being of people in the developing world. Severe health problems, death, and disease can be directly linked to unsafe hygiene practices that continue to plague many countries. A UN … Continue reading “Innovate4Health: SaTo Pan Delivers a Sustainable Solution to the Sanitation Crisis in Developing Nations”

Innovate4Health: Daktari Diagnostics Takes on Africa’s Healthcare Challenges One Diagnostic Device at a Time

This post is one of a series in the #Innovate4Health policy research initiative. By Alex Summerton & Nick Churchill Africa’s predominantly rural characteristic and limited medical infrastructure are among the region’s greatest challenges to implementing effective healthcare programs and policies for its residents. The high costs for patients associated with diagnosis and treatment in terms of … Continue reading “Innovate4Health: Daktari Diagnostics Takes on Africa’s Healthcare Challenges One Diagnostic Device at a Time”

Innovate4Health: Augmented Reality Technology Helps Bring Surgical Expertise to Conflict Zones and the Developing World

This post is one of a series in the #Innovate4Health policy research initiative. By Gleb Savich The majority of people in the world do not have access to safe and affordable surgical care. More than 2 billion people cannot receive surgical care simply because there are no surgical facilities where they live. Up to 3 … Continue reading “Innovate4Health: Augmented Reality Technology Helps Bring Surgical Expertise to Conflict Zones and the Developing World”