CPIP Fall Conference Papers Highlight How Intellectual Property Rights Promote Global Prosperity

By Alex Summerton The George Mason Law Review has just published the papers from our Fourth Annual Fall Conference, Intellectual Property & Global Prosperity, which was held at Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University, in Arlington, Virginia, on October 6-7, 2016. The conference highlighted the importance of IP rights in the global marketplace and … Continue reading “CPIP Fall Conference Papers Highlight How Intellectual Property Rights Promote Global Prosperity”

Innovate4Health: Miriam Bridges the Gap Between Developing-World Infrastructure and Cancer Detection

This post is one of a series in the #Innovate4Health policy research initiative. By Alex Summerton Originally a disease diagnosed only in developed countries, cancer is now a leading cause of death in the developing world with over half of all new cases annually. The rise in cancer in the developing world is attributed to … Continue reading “Innovate4Health: Miriam Bridges the Gap Between Developing-World Infrastructure and Cancer Detection”

Innovate4Health: Nutriset Uses Patents and Trademarks to Fight Severe Malnutrition Across the Globe

This post is one of a series in the #Innovate4Health policy research initiative. By Nick Churchill Malnutrition is one of the greatest global health challenges, particularly with regard to children and pregnant women in developing countries. Undernutrition contributes to nearly half of all deaths among children under the age of 5 and has lifelong consequences … Continue reading “Innovate4Health: Nutriset Uses Patents and Trademarks to Fight Severe Malnutrition Across the Globe”

Innovate4Health: New Oxygen Machine Technology Confronts Blackouts in Emerging Nations

This post is one of a series in the #Innovate4Health policy research initiative. By Andrew B. Levey Oxygen therapy, where supplemental oxygen is used as a medical treatment, is vital to children with pneumonia. Rolling blackouts in Uganda and other developing nations, which can last for hours at a time, are stopping oxygen concentrators—machines that … Continue reading “Innovate4Health: New Oxygen Machine Technology Confronts Blackouts in Emerging Nations”

Innovate4Health: Nanobiosym’s Gene-RADAR Brings Real-Time Results for Zika Testing

This post is one of a series in the #Innovate4Health policy research initiative. By Gabrielle Eriquez Because there is currently no preventative vaccine for Zika, a mosquito-borne virus known to cause severe birth defects in pregnant women, the ability to obtain a fast and accurate diagnosis is critical. However, especially in the developing world where … Continue reading “Innovate4Health: Nanobiosym’s Gene-RADAR Brings Real-Time Results for Zika Testing”

Innovate4Health: Treating Neonatal Jaundice in the Developing World with D-Rev’s Brilliance

This post is one of a series in the #Innovate4Health policy research initiative. By Nick Churchill Severe neonatal jaundice kills over 100,000 newborn babies annually and causes severe brain damage to thousands more. In most cases, the condition can be treated by simply shining a blue light on a baby’s skin. However, each year more than … Continue reading “Innovate4Health: Treating Neonatal Jaundice in the Developing World with D-Rev’s Brilliance”

Foreign Antitrust Regulators Are Threatening American Innovation

By David Lund & Matthew Barblan American businesses are suffering as foreign governments improperly use their antitrust laws to discriminate against American companies. Recently, the United States Chamber of Commerce assembled an International Competition Policy Expert Group to examine this problem. The Group released a report describing particular harmful and inappropriate uses of antitrust law … Continue reading “Foreign Antitrust Regulators Are Threatening American Innovation”

From Star Wars to La La Land: How Intellectual Property Fuels Films

The following post comes from Mandi Hart, a rising third-year law student at Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University, who worked as a video producer before going to law school. By Mandi Hart Movies are a first-love in America and around the world, and their production is made possible by the existence of intellectual … Continue reading “From Star Wars to La La Land: How Intellectual Property Fuels Films”

Explaining Efficient Infringement

By Adam Mossoff & Bhamati Viswanathan In a recent New York Times op-ed, “The Patent Troll Smokescreen,” Joe Nocera used in print for the first time the term, “efficient infringement.” This pithy phrase quickly gained currency if only because it captures a well-known phenomenon that has been impossible to describe in even a single sentence. … Continue reading “Explaining Efficient Infringement”

New CPIP Policy Brief: Open-Access Mandates and the Seductively False Promise of “Free”

CPIP has published a new policy brief entitled Open-Access Mandates and the Seductively False Promise of “Free.” The brief, written by CPIP Legal Fellow Bhamati Viswanathan and CPIP Director of Academic Programs & Senior Scholar Adam Mossoff, exposes the lack of evidence or justification for the proliferating legal mandates by federal agencies that coerce authors … Continue reading “New CPIP Policy Brief: Open-Access Mandates and the Seductively False Promise of “Free””