CPIP Founders File Amicus Brief on Behalf of 11 Law Professors in Converse v. ITC

CPIP Founders Adam Mossoff & Mark Schultz filed an amicus brief today on behalf of 11 law professors in Converse v. International Trade Commission, a trademark case currently before the Federal Circuit. In late-2014, Converse filed a complaint with the International Trade Commission alleging that more than thirty companies, including Skechers, Walmart, New Balance, and … Continue reading “CPIP Founders File Amicus Brief on Behalf of 11 Law Professors in Converse v. ITC”

Second Circuit Brings Some Sanity Back to Transformative Fair Use

The Second Circuit handed down an opinion in TCA Television v. McCollum earlier this week holding that a play’s inclusion of Abbott and Costello’s famous “Who’s on First?” routine was not transformative fair use. Given how expansive transformativeness has become lately, especially in the Second Circuit, the opinion is somewhat surprising. What’s more, it’s not … Continue reading “Second Circuit Brings Some Sanity Back to Transformative Fair Use”

FTC's PAE Study Makes Unsupported Recommendations

The FTC released its long-awaited study of so-called patent assertion entities, or PAEs, today. As many predicted, the FTC makes several broad recommendations for substantive and procedural reforms. The problem with this, however, is that the study was not designed to reveal the sort of data that could support such policy recommendations. The FTC itself … Continue reading “FTC's PAE Study Makes Unsupported Recommendations”

Professors Mislead FCC on Basic Copyright Law

In a letter submitted to the FCC late last week defending the Commission’s deeply flawed set-top box proposal,[1] a group of professors make an incredible claim: Everyone is perfectly free to distribute copyrighted works online however they please. No license? No problem! According to these professors, many of whom teach copyright law, copyright owners have … Continue reading “Professors Mislead FCC on Basic Copyright Law”

Criminal Copyright Infringement is Crime of "Moral Turpitude"

Cross-posted from the Law Theories blog. This past Friday, the Board of Immigration Appeals held that criminal copyright infringement constitutes a “crime involving moral turpitude” under immigration law. The Board reasoned that criminal copyright infringement is inherently immoral because it involves the willful theft of property and causes harm to both the copyright owner and … Continue reading “Criminal Copyright Infringement is Crime of "Moral Turpitude"”

Federal Circuit Again Finds Computer-Implemented Invention Patent Eligible

In Tuesday’s McRO v. Bandai decision, the Federal Circuit has once again reversed a district court’s determination that a computer-implemented invention (aka “software patent”) was not patent eligible under Section 101 of the Patent Act. This continues the Federal Circuit’s recent trend of clarifying the Supreme Court’s two-step patent-eligibility test under Mayo and Alice. The … Continue reading “Federal Circuit Again Finds Computer-Implemented Invention Patent Eligible”

CloudFlare's Desperate New Strategy to Protect Pirate Sites

San Francisco-based CloudFlare has earned a somewhat dubious reputation in the online world. Website owners can set up CloudFlare in just a few minutes, gaining the performance, security, and privacy benefits the service provides. Traffic routed through CloudFlare’s global content delivery network is cached for faster delivery times and protected from numerous online threats. Pirate … Continue reading “CloudFlare's Desperate New Strategy to Protect Pirate Sites”

Do As I Say, Not As I Do: Google’s Patent Transparency Hypocrisy

It is common today to hear that it’s simply impossible to search a field of technology to determine whether patents are valid or if there’s even freedom to operate at all. We hear this complaint about the lack of transparency in finding “prior art” in both the patent application process and about existing patents. The … Continue reading “Do As I Say, Not As I Do: Google’s Patent Transparency Hypocrisy”

Second Circuit Deepens Red Flag Knowledge Circuit Split in Vimeo

The Second Circuit’s recent opinion in Capitol Records v. Vimeo is, to put it mildly, pretty bad. From its convoluted reasoning that copyrights under state law for pre-1972 sound recordings are limited by the DMCA safe harbors, despite the explicit statement in Section 301(c) that “rights or remedies” under state law “shall not be annulled … Continue reading “Second Circuit Deepens Red Flag Knowledge Circuit Split in Vimeo”

Capitol Records v. Vimeo: Courts Should Stop Coddling Bad Actors in Copyright Cases

Here’s a brief excerpt of my new post that was published on IPWatchdog: Here’s where we are after Capitol Records v. Vimeo: A service provider can encourage its users to infringe on a massive scale, and so long as the infringement it encourages isn’t the specific infringement it gets sued for, it wins on the … Continue reading “Capitol Records v. Vimeo: Courts Should Stop Coddling Bad Actors in Copyright Cases”