Senate IP Subcommittee Hearing on DMCA Exposes Notice-and-Takedown Problems for Artists and Authors

The following post comes from Yumi Oda, an LLM at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Yumi Oda On June 2, the Senate Subcommittee on Intellectual Property held a virtual online hearing entitled Is the DMCA’s Notice-and-Takedown System Working in the 21st Century? The hearing focused on the effectiveness of the Section 512 … Continue reading “Senate IP Subcommittee Hearing on DMCA Exposes Notice-and-Takedown Problems for Artists and Authors”

Senator Ron Wyden, Stop Harming Independent Creators

Here’s a brief excerpt of a post by CPIP Senior Scholar Eric Priest and Professor Sean Pager that was published at IPWatchdog: As the current pandemic eviscerates jobs throughout our economy, Congress has a rare opportunity to improve the lot of one long-besieged group of workers: creators. Authors, songwriters, photographers, artists, filmmakers, and many other … Continue reading “Senator Ron Wyden, Stop Harming Independent Creators”

The AM-FM Bill and the Status of Terrestrial Music Broadcast Performance Rights

The following post comes from David Ward, a rising 2L at Scalia Law who is working as a Research Assistant this summer at CPIP. By David Ward This past Wednesday, the Senate Intellectual Property Subcommittee, led by its Chairman, Senator Thom Tillis (R-NC), held a virtual online briefing on the current state of music rights. … Continue reading “The AM-FM Bill and the Status of Terrestrial Music Broadcast Performance Rights”

Scalia Law Students and CPIP Scholars Make an Impact in Copyright Office Section 512 Study

The U.S. Copyright Office released its long-awaited report on Section 512 of Title 17 late last week. The Report is the culmination of more than four years of study by the Office of the safe harbor provisions for online service provider (OSP) liability in the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 (DMCA). Fortuitously, the study … Continue reading “Scalia Law Students and CPIP Scholars Make an Impact in Copyright Office Section 512 Study”

IP Scholars File Comments with OSTP on Public Access to Scholarly Publications

A group of intellectual property scholars filed comments yesterday with the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), asking it to forgo its plans to make all federally-funded scholarly publications free and open to the public upon initial publication. The comments were submitted in response to a notice of Request for Information (RFI) that was … Continue reading “IP Scholars File Comments with OSTP on Public Access to Scholarly Publications”

Copyright Notebook: Observations on Copyright in the Time of COVID-19

The Indomitable Spirit of Artists Heroes are everywhere. We all give thanks for the selfless efforts of medical professionals, first responders, delivery drivers, gig economy workers, grocery and pharmacy staff, and the many other individuals who daily place themselves at the center of the coronavirus pandemic in order to make our quarantined lives safe and … Continue reading “Copyright Notebook: Observations on Copyright in the Time of COVID-19”

IP Industries Step Up in This Time of Crisis

The global COVID-19 pandemic has challenged multiple aspects of modern society in a short time. Health and public safety, education, commerce, research, arts, and even basic government functions have had to change dramatically in the space of a couple months. Some good news in all this is the response of many companies in the intellectual … Continue reading “IP Industries Step Up in This Time of Crisis”

Supreme Court Paves Way for Revoking State Sovereign Immunity for Copyright Infringement

Last week, the Supreme Court handed down its unanimous judgment in Allen v. Cooper, a copyright case involving both actual and metaphorical pirates. The actual pirate was Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard, who captured a French ship in the Indies, renamed it Queen Anne’s Revenge, used it for piracy, and then later ran it … Continue reading “Supreme Court Paves Way for Revoking State Sovereign Immunity for Copyright Infringement”

Proposed Open Access Regulation is a Solution in Search of a Problem

Earlier this week, a coalition of over 125 publishers and non-profit scientific societies joined the Association of American Publishers (AAP) in a letter to the White House expressing serious concerns with a proposed Administration policy that would override intellectual property rights and threaten the advancement of scientific scholarship and innovation. In a flawed attempt to … Continue reading “Proposed Open Access Regulation is a Solution in Search of a Problem”

Members of Congress the Latest to Question ALI’s Restatement of Copyright

As copyright wonks are surely aware, the American Law Institute (ALI) has been busy with its first foray into restating a body of federal statutory law, the Restatement of Copyright. Restatements have traditionally covered state common-law topics, such as employment, property, trusts, and torts, which are primarily governed by some combination of state statutory and … Continue reading “Members of Congress the Latest to Question ALI’s Restatement of Copyright”