Creative Upstarts and Startups: How IP Creates Opportunities and Opens Doors

This is the first in a series of posts summarizing CPIP’s 2016 Fall Conference, “Intellectual Property & Global Prosperity.“ The conference was held at Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University on October 6-7, 2016. Videos of the conference panels and keynote address, as well as other materials, are available on the conference website. The … Continue reading “Creative Upstarts and Startups: How IP Creates Opportunities and Opens Doors”

UNITAID's Request for Suggestions on Breaking Down IP Barriers Ignores Harmful Patent Delay

Last month, global health initiative UNITAID launched an appeal for suggestions on breaking down barriers that frustrate the progress of public health. UNITAID is a multilateral partnership hosted by the World Health Organization whose mission is to develop systematic approaches to identifying challenges in the treatment of devastating diseases such as HIV, TB, and malaria. … Continue reading “UNITAID's Request for Suggestions on Breaking Down IP Barriers Ignores Harmful Patent Delay”

How Strong Patents Make Wealthy Nations

By Devlin Hartline & Kevin Madigan How did the world’s wealthiest nations grow rich? The answer, according to Professor Stephen Haber of Stanford University, is that “they had well-developed systems of private property.” In Patents and the Wealth of Nations, recently published in the CPIP Conference issue of the George Mason Law Review, Haber explains … Continue reading “How Strong Patents Make Wealthy Nations”

Acknowledging the Limitations of the FTC's PAE Study

The FTC’s long-awaited case study of patent assertion entities (PAEs) is expected to be released this spring. Using its subpoena power under Section 6(b) to gather information from a handful of firms, the study promises us a glimpse at their inner workings. But while the results may be interesting, they’ll also be too narrow to … Continue reading “Acknowledging the Limitations of the FTC's PAE Study”

How Patents Help Startups Grow, Innovate, and Succeed

Many academic studies of the patent system focus on the negative, extrapolating from anecdotes about a few bad actors to make the case that our patent system is broken and to bolster cries for legislation weakening patent rights. Precious few studies focus on the countless honest and hardworking patent owners whose inventive labors benefit us … Continue reading “How Patents Help Startups Grow, Innovate, and Succeed”

Repetition of Junk Science & Epithets Does Not Make Them True

Here’s a brief excerpt of a post by Adam Mossoff that was published on IPWatchdog. In their recent submission to the Washington Post’s series on so-called “patent reform” and “patent trolls,” James Bessen and Michael Meurer repeat the same junk science claims we’ve all heard many times before. In fact, the essay starts with a … Continue reading “Repetition of Junk Science & Epithets Does Not Make Them True”

It’s Time to Say “No” to Junk Science in the Patent Policy Debates

Last March, forty economists and law professors submitted a letter to Congress expressing “deep concerns with the many flawed, unreliable, or incomplete studies about the American patent system that have been provided to members of Congress.”  These concerns were confirmed again last week when Unified Patents released a report on patent litigation with the same … Continue reading “It’s Time to Say “No” to Junk Science in the Patent Policy Debates”

How Rhetorical Epithets Have Led the FTC Astray in its Study of Patent Licensing Firms

We’ve all heard the narrative about patent licensing firms, often referred to pejoratively as “patent trolls.” These patent owners, who choose to license their innovations rather than build them, are the supposed poster-children of a “broken” patent system. It’s as if commercializing one’s property, just like a landlord leases his land for another to use, … Continue reading “How Rhetorical Epithets Have Led the FTC Astray in its Study of Patent Licensing Firms”

Cohen et al. “Patent Trolls” Study Uses Incomplete Data, Performs Flawed Empirical Tests, and Makes Unsupportable Findings

PDF summary available here I.   Introduction A recent draft study about patent licensing companies entitled “Patent Trolls: Evidence from Targeted Firms” is making the rounds on Capitol Hill and receiving press coverage. This attention is unfortunate, because the study is deeply flawed and its conclusions cannot and should not be relied upon. If the … Continue reading “Cohen et al. “Patent Trolls” Study Uses Incomplete Data, Performs Flawed Empirical Tests, and Makes Unsupportable Findings”

Intellectual Property Unites Creators and Innovators

This is the first in a series of posts summarizing CPIP’s 2014 Fall Conference, “Common Ground: How Intellectual Property Unites Creators and Innovators.” The Conference was held at George Mason University School of Law on October 9-10, 2014. Videos of the conference panels and remarks, as well as panel summaries, will be available soon. Introduction … Continue reading “Intellectual Property Unites Creators and Innovators”