A View from Both Sides: COVID-19, the TRIPS Waiver, IP Rights, and How to Increase the Supply of Vaccines

Issue The United States and other wealthy nations have access to plenty of COVID-19 vaccine doses and thus are beginning to get the pandemic under control, while less affluent countries do not have access to adequate doses and are still struggling with rising cases. In October 2020, India and South Africa proposed addressing this problem … Continue reading “A View from Both Sides: COVID-19, the TRIPS Waiver, IP Rights, and How to Increase the Supply of Vaccines”

WTO IP Waiver Too Simplistic: Global Vaccine Tech-Transfer Needs Other Strategies

By Yogesh Pai Since October 2020, India and South Africa, joined by two-thirds of the WTO Members (African Group, LDCs and most of developing world) have been actively pursuing other developed country Members to agree to their request to waive global intellectual property (IP) rules. The waiver asserts that by suspending IP protection for COVID-19 … Continue reading “WTO IP Waiver Too Simplistic: Global Vaccine Tech-Transfer Needs Other Strategies”

The Tradeoffs Involved in New Drug Approval, Expanded Access, and Right to Try

The following post comes from CPIP Senior Fellow for Life Sciences Erika Lietzan, and it is cross-posted here from the Objective Intent blog with permission. This note explains some of the concepts swirling around in the media right now, relating to medicine approval. Much of what follows appears (or will appear) in an article on … Continue reading “The Tradeoffs Involved in New Drug Approval, Expanded Access, and Right to Try”

New York Times Recycles Discredited Positions on Government Patent Rights over Pharmaceuticals

By Sean O’Connor The New York Times is at it again. A year after its Editorial Board promoted flawed research on government rights to patented drugs as part of a price control plan, the Board floated the idea again, together with misinformation about the Bayh-Dole Act. Advocates looking for a magic bullet to reduce drug … Continue reading “New York Times Recycles Discredited Positions on Government Patent Rights over Pharmaceuticals”

CPIP Scholars Join Comments to FTC on How Antitrust Overreach is Threatening Healthcare Innovation

On December 21, 2018, CPIP Senior Scholars Adam Mossoff and Kristen Osenga joined former Federal Circuit Chief Judge Randall Rader and SIU Law’s Mark Schultz in comments submitted to the FTC as part of its ongoing Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century Hearings. Through the hearings, the FTC is examining whether recent economic … Continue reading “CPIP Scholars Join Comments to FTC on How Antitrust Overreach is Threatening Healthcare Innovation”