Professors Mislead FCC on Basic Copyright Law

In a letter submitted to the FCC late last week defending the Commission’s deeply flawed set-top box proposal,[1] a group of professors make an incredible claim: Everyone is perfectly free to distribute copyrighted works online however they please. No license? No problem! According to these professors, many of whom teach copyright law, copyright owners have … Continue reading “Professors Mislead FCC on Basic Copyright Law”

Federal Circuit Again Finds Computer-Implemented Invention Patent Eligible

In Tuesday’s McRO v. Bandai decision, the Federal Circuit has once again reversed a district court’s determination that a computer-implemented invention (aka “software patent”) was not patent eligible under Section 101 of the Patent Act. This continues the Federal Circuit’s recent trend of clarifying the Supreme Court’s two-step patent-eligibility test under Mayo and Alice. The … Continue reading “Federal Circuit Again Finds Computer-Implemented Invention Patent Eligible”

European Union Draws a Line on Infringing Hyperlinks

Last week, the European Court of Justice—the judicial authority of the European Union—issued an anticipated decision in the Sanoma hyperlinking case, declaring that commercial linking with knowledge of unauthorized content constitutes copyright infringement. The opinion comes after years of similar cases in Europe stirred debate over whether linking to pirated works was a ‘communication to the … Continue reading “European Union Draws a Line on Infringing Hyperlinks”

Despite What You Hear, Notice and Takedown is Failing Creators and Copyright Owners

In a recent op-ed in the LA Times, Professors Chris Sprigman and Mark Lemley praise the notice and takedown provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) as “a bit of copyright law worth saving.” They argue that Section 512 of the DMCA continues to serve its purpose of balancing the rights of copyright owners … Continue reading “Despite What You Hear, Notice and Takedown is Failing Creators and Copyright Owners”

CloudFlare's Desperate New Strategy to Protect Pirate Sites

San Francisco-based CloudFlare has earned a somewhat dubious reputation in the online world. Website owners can set up CloudFlare in just a few minutes, gaining the performance, security, and privacy benefits the service provides. Traffic routed through CloudFlare’s global content delivery network is cached for faster delivery times and protected from numerous online threats. Pirate … Continue reading “CloudFlare's Desperate New Strategy to Protect Pirate Sites”

Letter on FCC Set-Top Box Regulation Once Again Confuses the Issue

Last week, a group of law professors wrote a letter to the acting Librarian of Congress in which they claim that the current FCC proposal to regulate cable video navigation systems does not deprive copyright owners of the exclusive rights guaranteed by the Copyright Act. The letter repeats arguments from response comments they  filed along with … Continue reading “Letter on FCC Set-Top Box Regulation Once Again Confuses the Issue”

The Dangerous Combination of Content Theft and Malware

Cross-posted from the Mister Copyright blog. Malware, short for malicious software, has been used to infiltrate and contaminate computers since the early 1980s. But what began as relatively benign software designed to prank and annoy users has developed into a variety of hostile programs intended to hijack, steal, extort, and attack. Disguised software including computer … Continue reading “The Dangerous Combination of Content Theft and Malware”

Three Years Later, DMCA Still Just as Broken

By Matthew Barblan & Kevin Madigan In 2013, CPIP published a policy brief by Professor Bruce Boyden exposing the DMCA notice and takedown system as outdated and in need of reform. The Failure of the DMCA Notice and Takedown System explained that while Section 512 of the DMCA was intended as a way for copyright … Continue reading “Three Years Later, DMCA Still Just as Broken”

Second Circuit Deepens Red Flag Knowledge Circuit Split in Vimeo

The Second Circuit’s recent opinion in Capitol Records v. Vimeo is, to put it mildly, pretty bad. From its convoluted reasoning that copyrights under state law for pre-1972 sound recordings are limited by the DMCA safe harbors, despite the explicit statement in Section 301(c) that “rights or remedies” under state law “shall not be annulled … Continue reading “Second Circuit Deepens Red Flag Knowledge Circuit Split in Vimeo”

Advertiser Pledge Sets Example of Accountability in the Fight Against Piracy

Cross-posted from the Mister Copyright blog. It should come as no surprise that popular websites make money by hosting advertisements. Anyone surfing the web has undoubtedly been bombarded with ads when visiting certain sites, and for websites that offer free services or user experiences, advertisements are often the only way to generate revenue. Unfortunately, websites … Continue reading “Advertiser Pledge Sets Example of Accountability in the Fight Against Piracy”