No Consensus That Broad Patent ‘Reform’ is Necessary or Helpful

Here’s a brief excerpt of an op-ed by Adam Mossoff & Devlin Hartline that was published in The Hill: Two recent op-eds published in The Hill argue that broad patent legislation—misleadingly labeled “reform”—is needed because the U.S. patent system is fundamentally broken. In the first, Timothy Lee contends that opponents “cannot with a straight face” … Continue reading “No Consensus That Broad Patent ‘Reform’ is Necessary or Helpful”

How Patents Help Startups Grow, Innovate, and Succeed

Many academic studies of the patent system focus on the negative, extrapolating from anecdotes about a few bad actors to make the case that our patent system is broken and to bolster cries for legislation weakening patent rights. Precious few studies focus on the countless honest and hardworking patent owners whose inventive labors benefit us … Continue reading “How Patents Help Startups Grow, Innovate, and Succeed”

Principles and Priorities to Guide Congress’s Ongoing Copyright Review

Last week, CPIP published a new white paper, Copyright Principles and Priorities to Foster a Creative Digital Marketplace, by Sandra Aistars, Mark Schultz, and myself, which draws from the testimonies and scholarly writings of CPIP Senior Scholars in order to guide Congress as it continues its comprehensive review of the Copyright Act. The white paper … Continue reading “Principles and Priorities to Guide Congress’s Ongoing Copyright Review”

Repetition of Junk Science & Epithets Does Not Make Them True

Here’s a brief excerpt of a post by Adam Mossoff that was published on IPWatchdog. In their recent submission to the Washington Post’s series on so-called “patent reform” and “patent trolls,” James Bessen and Michael Meurer repeat the same junk science claims we’ve all heard many times before. In fact, the essay starts with a … Continue reading “Repetition of Junk Science & Epithets Does Not Make Them True”

Debunking Myths About the Proposed Federal Trade Secrets Act

By Mark Schultz Today, CPIP is proud to release a paper authored by the nation’s preeminent expert on trade secret law, James Pooley. Mr. Pooley’s paper explains the arguments in favor of the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2015 (“DTSA”), which is currently being considered by Congress. To download the paper, please click here. The … Continue reading “Debunking Myths About the Proposed Federal Trade Secrets Act”

Will Increasing the Term of Data Exclusivity for Biologic Drugs in the TPP Reduce Access to Medicines?

The following guest post comes from Philip Stevens, Director of the Geneva Network, a research and advocacy organization working on international health, trade, and intellectual property issues. The original research note can be found here. By Philip Stevens In the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations, the U.S. and Japan have proposed that TPP partners increase their … Continue reading “Will Increasing the Term of Data Exclusivity for Biologic Drugs in the TPP Reduce Access to Medicines?”

Making Copyright Work for Creative Upstarts

The following post is by CPIP Research Associate Matt McIntee, a rising 2L at George Mason University School of Law. McIntee reviews a paper from CPIP’s 2014 Fall Conference, Common Ground: How Intellectual Property Unites Creators and Innovators. By Matt McIntee In Making Copyright Work for Creative Upstarts, recently published in the George Mason Law … Continue reading “Making Copyright Work for Creative Upstarts”

It’s Time to Say “No” to Junk Science in the Patent Policy Debates

Last March, forty economists and law professors submitted a letter to Congress expressing “deep concerns with the many flawed, unreliable, or incomplete studies about the American patent system that have been provided to members of Congress.”  These concerns were confirmed again last week when Unified Patents released a report on patent litigation with the same … Continue reading “It’s Time to Say “No” to Junk Science in the Patent Policy Debates”

How Rhetorical Epithets Have Led the FTC Astray in its Study of Patent Licensing Firms

We’ve all heard the narrative about patent licensing firms, often referred to pejoratively as “patent trolls.” These patent owners, who choose to license their innovations rather than build them, are the supposed poster-children of a “broken” patent system. It’s as if commercializing one’s property, just like a landlord leases his land for another to use, … Continue reading “How Rhetorical Epithets Have Led the FTC Astray in its Study of Patent Licensing Firms”

The One Year Anniversary: The Aftermath of #AliceStorm

The following post, by Robert R. Sachs, first appeared on the Bilski Blog, and it is reposted here with permission. It’s been one year since the Supreme Court’s decision in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank. On its face the opinion was relatively conservative, cautioning courts to “tread carefully” before invalidating patents, and emphasizing that the … Continue reading “The One Year Anniversary: The Aftermath of #AliceStorm”