The Unintended Consequences of Patent "Reform"

By Steven Tjoe Much of today’s patent policy debate focuses on the dynamics of patent litigation.  Sensational anecdotes of abusive demand letters, litigants strategically exploiting bad patents, and tales of so-called “patent trolls” (reinforced by now debunked empirical claims) have captured the public’s imagination and spurred Congress to rush to revise the patent system.  Unfortunately, … Continue reading “The Unintended Consequences of Patent "Reform"”

Taking a Whack at the DMCA: The Problem of Continuous Re-Posting

By Steven Tjoe On Thursday March 13, the House Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s (DMCA) notice and takedown system.  Among the witnesses testifying at the hearing was CPIP Fellow Professor Sean O’Connor (Washington University School of Law), who offered his insights on Section 512 from his unique position as … Continue reading “Taking a Whack at the DMCA: The Problem of Continuous Re-Posting”

Improving the DMCA's Notice and Takedown System

In conjunction with today’s House Judiciary Committee hearing on the DMCA, CPIP Senior Scholar Prof. Mark Schultz published a critique of the notice and takedown system this morning on AEI’s TechPolicyDaily Blog. In his critique, Prof. Schultz discusses CPIP’s policy brief by Prof. Bruce Boyden, which details the failures of the DMCA – despite the massive number of takedown notices sent, not a … Continue reading “Improving the DMCA's Notice and Takedown System”

Adam Mossoff on Patented Innovation, Licensing & Litigation (Transcript)

Below is the text of the oral testimony provided by Professor Adam Mossoff to the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, the Consumer Protection, Product Safety, and Insurance Subcommittee, in its November 7, 2013 hearing on “Demand Letters and Consumer Protection: Examining Deceptive Practices by Patent Assertion Entities.” Information on the hearing is here, including … Continue reading “Adam Mossoff on Patented Innovation, Licensing & Litigation (Transcript)”

GAO Report Confirms No “Patent Troll” Litigation Problem

As we previously reported, there are serious concerns with the studies asserting that a “patent litigation explosion” has been caused by patent licensing companies (so-called non-practicing entities (“NPEs”) or “patent trolls”). These seemingly alarming studies (see here and here) have drawn scholarly criticism for their use of proprietary, secret data collected from companies like RPX … Continue reading “GAO Report Confirms No “Patent Troll” Litigation Problem”

Teleforum Panel on End-User Lawsuits in Patent Law on August 29 (free and open to the public)

End-User Lawsuits in Patent Litigation: A Bug or a Feature of Patent Law? A Teleforum Panel (Free and Open to the Public) Thursday, August 29, 2013 Noon – 1pm (EST) In the patent policy debates today, one issue that has proven a flash point of controversy is patent infringement lawsuits against consumers and retailers, such … Continue reading “Teleforum Panel on End-User Lawsuits in Patent Law on August 29 (free and open to the public)”

The Myth of the “Patent Troll” Litigation Explosion

[Cross posted at Truth on the Market] In a prior blog posting, I reported how reports of a so-called “patent litigation explosion” today are just wrong.  As I detailed in another blog posting, the percentage of patent lawsuits today are not only consistent with historical patent litigation rates in the nineteenth century, there is actually … Continue reading “The Myth of the “Patent Troll” Litigation Explosion”

Summary of Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons by Professor Chris Newman

Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons, U.S. Supreme Court, decided March 19, 2013 Chris Newman Assistant Professor of Law George Mason University School of Law This is best described as a decision in which the Court felt compelled to choose between two readings of the Copyright Act, either of which led to unpalatable results.   One reading … Continue reading “Summary of Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons by Professor Chris Newman”

The SHIELD Act: When Bad Economic Studies Make Bad Laws

[Cross-Posted at Truth on the Market on March 15, 2013] Earlier this month, Representatives Peter DeFazio and Jason Chaffetz picked up the gauntlet from President Obama’s comments on February 14 at a Google-sponsored Internet Q&A on Google+ that “our efforts at patent reform only went about halfway to where we need to go” and that … Continue reading “The SHIELD Act: When Bad Economic Studies Make Bad Laws”

Scratching my Head Over the SHIELD Act

By Michael Risch [The following is a blog posting by Michael Risch, a patent law scholar at Villanova Law School, that he originally posted on March 10, 2013 at the law professor group blog, Madisonian.net, where Professor Risch regularly blogs.  Professor Risch kindly gave us permission to repost his blog posting here.] Scratching my Head Over the … Continue reading “Scratching my Head Over the SHIELD Act”