The Myth of the “Patent Troll” Litigation Explosion

[Cross posted at Truth on the Market] In a prior blog posting, I reported how reports of a so-called “patent litigation explosion” today are just wrong.  As I detailed in another blog posting, the percentage of patent lawsuits today are not only consistent with historical patent litigation rates in the nineteenth century, there is actually … Continue reading “The Myth of the “Patent Troll” Litigation Explosion”

Summary of Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons by Professor Chris Newman

Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons, U.S. Supreme Court, decided March 19, 2013 Chris Newman Assistant Professor of Law George Mason University School of Law This is best described as a decision in which the Court felt compelled to choose between two readings of the Copyright Act, either of which led to unpalatable results.   One reading … Continue reading “Summary of Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons by Professor Chris Newman”

The SHIELD Act: When Bad Economic Studies Make Bad Laws

[Cross-Posted at Truth on the Market on March 15, 2013] Earlier this month, Representatives Peter DeFazio and Jason Chaffetz picked up the gauntlet from President Obama’s comments on February 14 at a Google-sponsored Internet Q&A on Google+ that “our efforts at patent reform only went about halfway to where we need to go” and that … Continue reading “The SHIELD Act: When Bad Economic Studies Make Bad Laws”

Scratching my Head Over the SHIELD Act

By Michael Risch [The following is a blog posting by Michael Risch, a patent law scholar at Villanova Law School, that he originally posted on March 10, 2013 at the law professor group blog, Madisonian.net, where Professor Risch regularly blogs.  Professor Risch kindly gave us permission to repost his blog posting here.] Scratching my Head Over the … Continue reading “Scratching my Head Over the SHIELD Act”