Mark Schultz: Weaker Patent Protection Leads to Less Venture Capital Investment

The following post comes from David Ward, a 2L at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By David Ward Venture capitalists pouring money into a small startup has become a sort of new American Dream for many innovators. The success stories of big American companies starting with nothing more than an idea have … Continue reading “Mark Schultz: Weaker Patent Protection Leads to Less Venture Capital Investment”

New CPIP Policy Brief: The Long Shadow of the Blackberry Shutdown That Wasn’t

CPIP has published a new policy brief by CPIP Senior Fellow for Innovation Policy Jonathan Barnett entitled The Long Shadow of the Blackberry Shutdown That Wasn’t. The policy brief looks at how the Blackberry litigation and the “patent troll” narrative ultimately contributed to the Supreme Court’s 2006 decision in eBay v. MercExchange that limited the … Continue reading “New CPIP Policy Brief: The Long Shadow of the Blackberry Shutdown That Wasn’t”

New Paper Looks at “Ill-Advised Legislative Proposals” to Address Pharmaceutical “Evergreening”

The following post comes from Yumi Oda, an LLM Candidate at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Yumi Oda Many believe that drug prices in the U.S. are unnecessarily high because the pharmaceutical industry is exploiting legal loopholes and acquiring dubious patents to extend protection and delay generics from entering the market … Continue reading “New Paper Looks at “Ill-Advised Legislative Proposals” to Address Pharmaceutical “Evergreening””

New Paper Explores Possibility of Gold-Plated Patents Beyond the PTAB’s Reach

What if there is a way for a patent applicant to obtain a “gold-plated patent” that is immune to administrative cancellation before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO)? This intriguing notion is the subject of a recent paper by Professor Michael S. Greve of Scalia Law, … Continue reading “New Paper Explores Possibility of Gold-Plated Patents Beyond the PTAB’s Reach”

New York Times Recycles Discredited Positions on Government Patent Rights over Pharmaceuticals

By Sean O’Connor The New York Times is at it again. A year after its Editorial Board promoted flawed research on government rights to patented drugs as part of a price control plan, the Board floated the idea again, together with misinformation about the Bayh-Dole Act. Advocates looking for a magic bullet to reduce drug … Continue reading “New York Times Recycles Discredited Positions on Government Patent Rights over Pharmaceuticals”

Supreme Court to Assess USPTO’s Controversial Attorneys’ Fees Position

By Chris Katopis & Devlin Hartline This week, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear an important case concerning patent law procedures and the American legal system in general. In Iancu v. NantKwest, the Court asks, “Does all really mean all?” Specifically, the Court will examine whether Section 145 of the Patent Act, which provides … Continue reading “Supreme Court to Assess USPTO’s Controversial Attorneys’ Fees Position”

Recognizing the Limits of Government Procurement in the Pharmaceutical Industries

While recent headlines claim that rising drug prices can be easily addressed through government intervention, the procedures involved with government use of patented technologies are complex and often misunderstood. In addition to owning and practicing a vast portfolio of patents, the government has the power to procure and use patented technologies—including pharmaceutical medicines—in limited circumstances … Continue reading “Recognizing the Limits of Government Procurement in the Pharmaceutical Industries”

CPIP Scholars Join Amicus Brief Arguing that the Government Cannot Petition for CBM Review

On December 17, 2018, CPIP Senior Scholars Adam Mossoff and Kristen Osenga joined an amicus brief written on behalf of seven law professors by Professor Adam MacLeod, a CPIP Thomas Edison Innovation Fellow for 2017 and 2018 and a member of CPIP’s growing community of scholars. The brief, which was filed in Return Mail Inc. … Continue reading “CPIP Scholars Join Amicus Brief Arguing that the Government Cannot Petition for CBM Review”

Qualcomm Founder Dr. Irwin M. Jacobs Delights Attendees at CPIP’s Sixth Annual Fall Conference

By Kathleen Wills* On October 11-12, 2018, the Center for the Protection of Intellectual Property (CPIP) hosted its Sixth Annual Fall Conference at Antonin Scalia Law School in Arlington, Virginia. The theme of the conference was IP for the Next Generation of Technology, and it featured a number of panel discussions and presentations on how … Continue reading “Qualcomm Founder Dr. Irwin M. Jacobs Delights Attendees at CPIP’s Sixth Annual Fall Conference”

A Cure Worse Than the Disease? Proposed Changes to European Patent Law are Threatening Pharmaceutical Innovation

Innovation is all around us. We love and appreciate the latest video games, software apps, and smartphones. We await the integration of self-driving cars and other forms of artificial intelligence. Beyond the gadgets and luxuries we think we can’t live without, there are even more essential products that affect the lives of millions around the … Continue reading “A Cure Worse Than the Disease? Proposed Changes to European Patent Law are Threatening Pharmaceutical Innovation”