Federal Circuit Again Finds Computer-Implemented Invention Patent Eligible

In Tuesday’s McRO v. Bandai decision, the Federal Circuit has once again reversed a district court’s determination that a computer-implemented invention (aka “software patent”) was not patent eligible under Section 101 of the Patent Act. This continues the Federal Circuit’s recent trend of clarifying the Supreme Court’s two-step patent-eligibility test under Mayo and Alice. The … Continue reading “Federal Circuit Again Finds Computer-Implemented Invention Patent Eligible”

Federal Circuit Brings Some Clarity and Sanity Back to Patent Eligibility Doctrine

By Adam Mossoff and Kevin Madigan Following the Supreme Court’s four decisions on patent eligibility for inventions under § 101 of the Patent Act, there has been much disruption and uncertainty in the patent system. The patent bar and most stakeholders in the innovation industries have found the Supreme Court’s decisions in Alice Corp. v. … Continue reading “Federal Circuit Brings Some Clarity and Sanity Back to Patent Eligibility Doctrine”

Federal Circuit Threatens Innovation: Dissecting the Ariosa v. Sequenom Opinion

By Patent Publius Earlier this month, the Federal Circuit issued its opinion in Ariosa v. Sequenom, a closely-watched biotechnology case with significant repercussions for patent-eligibility analysis generally. Unfortunately, the Federal Circuit misapplies the Supreme Court’s analytical framework from Mayo v. Prometheus, striking down Sequenom’s important innovation for the prenatal diagnosis of fetal abnormalities. The shame … Continue reading “Federal Circuit Threatens Innovation: Dissecting the Ariosa v. Sequenom Opinion”

The Critical Role of Patents in the Development, Commercialization, and Utilization of Innovative Genetic Diagnostic Tests

Last week, CPIP released an important new policy brief, The Critical Role of Patents in the Development, Commercialization, and Utilization of Innovative Genetic Diagnostic Tests, by Professor Chris Holman.  Professor Holman explains the important role that patents play not only in attracting the capital investment needed to bring genetic tests to market, but also in incentivizing companies … Continue reading “The Critical Role of Patents in the Development, Commercialization, and Utilization of Innovative Genetic Diagnostic Tests”

Alice Gets the Most Important Question Right

By far the most important takeaway from today’s Supreme Court decision in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank  is the Court’s acknowledgment that “many computer-implemented claims are formally addressed to patent-eligible subject matter.”  Despite failing to alleviate the profound confusion caused by its recent §101 analysis in cases like Bilski, Myriad, Mayo, and plenty of earlier … Continue reading “Alice Gets the Most Important Question Right”

A Brief History of Software Patents (and Why They’re Valid)

Today, there is significant public debate over patents on the digital processes and machines that comprise computer software programs. These are often referred to as “software patents,” but this is an odd moniker. Aside from the similarly mislabeled debate over “DNA patents,” nowhere else in the patent system do we refer to patents on machines … Continue reading “A Brief History of Software Patents (and Why They’re Valid)”

Today’s Software Patents Look a Lot Like Early Pharma Patents

[Cross Posted to Truth on the Market] The recent New York Times article on the high-tech industry argues that software patents and the current “smart phone war” are a disaster for innovation, and it backs this with quotes and cites from a horde of academics and judges, like Judge Richard Posner, that software patents are … Continue reading “Today’s Software Patents Look a Lot Like Early Pharma Patents”