Recognizing the Limits of Government Procurement in the Pharmaceutical Industries

While recent headlines claim that rising drug prices can be easily addressed through government intervention, the procedures involved with government use of patented technologies are complex and often misunderstood. In addition to owning and practicing a vast portfolio of patents, the government has the power to procure and use patented technologies—including pharmaceutical medicines—in limited circumstances … Continue reading “Recognizing the Limits of Government Procurement in the Pharmaceutical Industries”

A Cure Worse Than the Disease? Proposed Changes to European Patent Law are Threatening Pharmaceutical Innovation

Innovation is all around us. We love and appreciate the latest video games, software apps, and smartphones. We await the integration of self-driving cars and other forms of artificial intelligence. Beyond the gadgets and luxuries we think we can’t live without, there are even more essential products that affect the lives of millions around the … Continue reading “A Cure Worse Than the Disease? Proposed Changes to European Patent Law are Threatening Pharmaceutical Innovation”

New CPIP Policy Brief: An Unwise Move to Discriminate Against Pharmaceutical Patents

CPIP has published a new policy brief entitled An Unwise Move to Discriminate Against Pharmaceutical Patents: Responding to the UN’s Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Patent Examination. The brief, written by CPIP Senior Scholar and UMKC Professor of Law Chris Holman, analyzes the UN’s recent Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Patent Examination, which are influential in the policy debates … Continue reading “New CPIP Policy Brief: An Unwise Move to Discriminate Against Pharmaceutical Patents”

CPIP Scholars Examine the Flaws in the Term “Evergreening”

In their new paper, Evergreening of Pharmaceutical Exclusivity: Sorting Fact from Misunderstanding and Fiction, Professors Kristina Acri née Lybecker and Mark Schultz, along with CPIP John F. Witherspoon Legal Fellow David Lund, analyze how the term “evergreening” is used in the context of pharmaceuticals. After sorting through the vagaries and rhetorical excesses that restrict meaningful … Continue reading “CPIP Scholars Examine the Flaws in the Term “Evergreening””

The Drug Innovation Paradox: Matching Incentives to Market Realities

The hardest things are often the most important things. That’s one of the implicit justifications for the intellectual property system. If we want people to do the hard and important work of researching, developing, and commercializing game-changing innovations, then we need to secure the fruits of their labor with property rights. In her forthcoming paper, … Continue reading “The Drug Innovation Paradox: Matching Incentives to Market Realities”