Scalia Law Alums Help Arts & Entertainment Advocacy Clinic Draft Influential Amicus Brief

Last spring, the Arts & Entertainment Advocacy Clinic at Scalia Law School filed an amicus brief on behalf of intellectual property law scholars in the Fox News v. TVEyes copyright infringement case. Assisting the students on the project was practicing IP attorney and Scalia Law alum Jennifer Atkins, who volunteered her time—and the time of … Continue reading “Scalia Law Alums Help Arts & Entertainment Advocacy Clinic Draft Influential Amicus Brief”

Debunking Myths About the Proposed Federal Trade Secrets Act

By Mark Schultz Today, CPIP is proud to release a paper authored by the nation’s preeminent expert on trade secret law, James Pooley. Mr. Pooley’s paper explains the arguments in favor of the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2015 (“DTSA”), which is currently being considered by Congress. To download the paper, please click here. The … Continue reading “Debunking Myths About the Proposed Federal Trade Secrets Act”

Strong IP Protection Provides Inventors and Creators the Economic Freedom to Create

Here’s a brief excerpt of a post by Terrica Carrington that was published on IPWatchdog. CPIP went against the grain with this conference, and showed us, bit by bit, what our world might look like today without intellectual property rights. Music wouldn’t sound the same. Movies wouldn’t look the same. You wouldn’t be reading this … Continue reading “Strong IP Protection Provides Inventors and Creators the Economic Freedom to Create”

Crowdfunding's Impact on Start-Up IP Strategy

By Sean M. O’Connor* Crowdfunding has been heralded as a revolutionary and democratic way to connect ordinary individuals with innovative projects they would like to support. The version involving equity investments in start-ups will be regulated under the U.S. JOBS Act of 2012.[i] But start-ups who use this legal pathway will become essentially “junior” reporting … Continue reading “Crowdfunding's Impact on Start-Up IP Strategy”