Federal Circuit Again Finds Computer-Implemented Invention Patent Eligible

In Tuesday’s McRO v. Bandai decision, the Federal Circuit has once again reversed a district court’s determination that a computer-implemented invention (aka “software patent”) was not patent eligible under Section 101 of the Patent Act. This continues the Federal Circuit’s recent trend of clarifying the Supreme Court’s two-step patent-eligibility test under Mayo and Alice. The … Continue reading “Federal Circuit Again Finds Computer-Implemented Invention Patent Eligible”

The Nadir of “Patent Troll” Rhetoric

The venerable high-tech company IBM is no more a “patent troll” than any other legitimate company that engages in patent licensing. Yet, according to the very arguments of those who are using this ill-defined and misleading term, the shoe fits. The case in point is the recent demand letter IBM sent to Twitter, asserting violation of … Continue reading “The Nadir of “Patent Troll” Rhetoric”

The Myth of the “Patent Troll” Litigation Explosion

[Cross posted at Truth on the Market] In a prior blog posting, I reported how reports of a so-called “patent litigation explosion” today are just wrong.  As I detailed in another blog posting, the percentage of patent lawsuits today are not only consistent with historical patent litigation rates in the nineteenth century, there is actually … Continue reading “The Myth of the “Patent Troll” Litigation Explosion”

The SHIELD Act: When Bad Economic Studies Make Bad Laws

[Cross-Posted at Truth on the Market on March 15, 2013] Earlier this month, Representatives Peter DeFazio and Jason Chaffetz picked up the gauntlet from President Obama’s comments on February 14 at a Google-sponsored Internet Q&A on Google+ that “our efforts at patent reform only went about halfway to where we need to go” and that … Continue reading “The SHIELD Act: When Bad Economic Studies Make Bad Laws”