CPIP 2020 Fall Conference: Day One Recap

The following post comes from Terence Yen, a 4E at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. This is the first of two posts (see day two recap) summarizing our two-day 5G at the Nexus of IP, Antitrust, and Technology Leadership conference that was held online from George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School … Continue reading “CPIP 2020 Fall Conference: Day One Recap”

LeadershIP 2020: Injunctive Relief in Standard-Essential Patent Cases

The following post comes from Colin Kreutzer, a 2E at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Colin Kreutzer The LeadershIP conference is dedicated to promoting an open dialogue on global issues surrounding innovation, intellectual property, and antitrust policy. On September 10th, LeadershIP kicked off its 2020 series of virtual events with a … Continue reading “LeadershIP 2020: Injunctive Relief in Standard-Essential Patent Cases”

CPIP Roundup – September 30, 2020

Greetings from CPIP Executive Director Sean O’Connor As we move through our busy fall season here at CPIP, we are grateful for the efforts of everyone in the George Mason University community keeping us safe and healthy. We are fortunate that in these highly uncertain times, we are still able to focus on what we … Continue reading “CPIP Roundup – September 30, 2020”

Mark Schultz: Weaker Patent Protection Leads to Less Venture Capital Investment

The following post comes from David Ward, a 2L at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By David Ward Venture capitalists pouring money into a small startup has become a sort of new American Dream for many innovators. The success stories of big American companies starting with nothing more than an idea have … Continue reading “Mark Schultz: Weaker Patent Protection Leads to Less Venture Capital Investment”

Supreme Court to Assess USPTO’s Controversial Attorneys’ Fees Position

By Chris Katopis & Devlin Hartline This week, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear an important case concerning patent law procedures and the American legal system in general. In Iancu v. NantKwest, the Court asks, “Does all really mean all?” Specifically, the Court will examine whether Section 145 of the Patent Act, which provides … Continue reading “Supreme Court to Assess USPTO’s Controversial Attorneys’ Fees Position”