Event Recap: Great Inventors and the Patent System

On February 16, 2017, CPIP hosted a panel discussion, America as a Place of Innovation: Great Inventors and the Patent System, at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. The event was co-hosted by the Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation at the Smithsonian Institution and the U.S. Patent … Continue reading “Event Recap: Great Inventors and the Patent System”

Repetition of Junk Science & Epithets Does Not Make Them True

Here’s a brief excerpt of a post by Adam Mossoff that was published on IPWatchdog. In their recent submission to the Washington Post’s series on so-called “patent reform” and “patent trolls,” James Bessen and Michael Meurer repeat the same junk science claims we’ve all heard many times before. In fact, the essay starts with a … Continue reading “Repetition of Junk Science & Epithets Does Not Make Them True”

Patent Licensing and Secondary Markets in the Nineteenth Century

The following post comes from CPIP Programs and Research Associate Terrica Carrington, a rising 3L at George Mason University School of Law, and Devlin Hartline, Assistant Director at CPIP. They review a paper from CPIP’s 2014 Fall Conference, Common Ground: How Intellectual Property Unites Creators and Innovators, that was recently published in the George Mason … Continue reading “Patent Licensing and Secondary Markets in the Nineteenth Century”

The History of Patent Licensing and Secondary Markets in Patents: An Antidote to False Rhetoric

The patent licensing business model is a flashpoint of controversy in the patent policy debates. Individuals and firms that specialize in licensing patented innovation – and companies that purchase patents in order to license them – have come under attack by the President, members of Congress, companies, lobbying groups, and others. On December 6, 2013, … Continue reading “The History of Patent Licensing and Secondary Markets in Patents: An Antidote to False Rhetoric”