Last Chance to Register for the Copyright and Technology NYC 2016 Conference

Tomorrow is the last chance to register for the Copyright and Technology NYC 2016 Conference. The conference will be held next Tuesday, January 19th, at New York University’s Kimmel Center. In addition to Matthew Barblan and Devlin Hartline from CPIP, participants will come from the following organizations: ASCAP BMI CBS CCIA Charter Communications Cisco Copyright … Continue reading “Last Chance to Register for the Copyright and Technology NYC 2016 Conference”

Join Us at the Copyright and Technology NYC 2016 Conference on January 19

Co-produced by GiantSteps, the Copyright Society, and Musonomics, the Copyright and Technology NYC 2016 Conference will be held at New York University’s Kimmel Center on Tuesday, January 19th. CPIP is a proud Media Sponsor of the event. The conference program is available here, and registration is still open here. Jacqueline Charlesworth, General Counsel and Associate … Continue reading “Join Us at the Copyright and Technology NYC 2016 Conference on January 19”

BMG v. Cox: ISP Liability and the Power of Inference

Cross-posted from the Law Theories blog. As readers are likely aware, the jury verdict in BMG v. Cox was handed down on December 17th. The jury found that BMG had proved by a preponderance of the evidence that Cox’s users were direct infringers and that Cox is contributorily liable for that infringement. The interesting thing, … Continue reading “BMG v. Cox: ISP Liability and the Power of Inference”

Protecting Artists from Streaming Piracy Benefits Creativity and Technology

Here’s a brief excerpt of an op-ed by Devlin Hartline & Matthew Barblan that was published in The Hill: In his recent op-ed in The Hill, Mike Montgomery argues that “[m]aking streaming copyright infringement a felony is a terrible idea” that will create “further rifts between tech and entertainment at a time when these two … Continue reading “Protecting Artists from Streaming Piracy Benefits Creativity and Technology”

Principles and Priorities to Guide Congress’s Ongoing Copyright Review

Last week, CPIP published a new white paper, Copyright Principles and Priorities to Foster a Creative Digital Marketplace, by Sandra Aistars, Mark Schultz, and myself, which draws from the testimonies and scholarly writings of CPIP Senior Scholars in order to guide Congress as it continues its comprehensive review of the Copyright Act. The white paper … Continue reading “Principles and Priorities to Guide Congress’s Ongoing Copyright Review”

Protecting Authors and Artists by Closing the Streaming Loophole

We’ve released a new policy brief, Protecting Authors and Artists by Closing the Streaming Loophole, by Devlin Hartline & Matthew Barblan. They argue that in order to protect authors and artists from having their works repeatedly stolen on the internet, it is long past time to harmonize the remedies for criminal copyright infringement to reflect … Continue reading “Protecting Authors and Artists by Closing the Streaming Loophole”

CloudFlare Enjoined From Aiding Infringers: Internet Unbroken

Just how far does a court’s power to enjoin reach into cyberspace? It’s clear enough that those directly posting or hosting infringing content are subject to an injunction. But what about a company such as CloudFlare that provides content delivery network and domain name server services? Does an injunction under Rule 65 against anyone acting … Continue reading “CloudFlare Enjoined From Aiding Infringers: Internet Unbroken”

Copyright’s Republic: Promoting an Independent and Professional Class of Creators and Creative Businesses

By Mark Schultz and Devlin Hartline The following essay is the first in a series of CPIP essays celebrating the 225th anniversary of the Copyright Act by recognizing the rich purposes, benefits, and contributions of copyright. This series of essays will be published together in a forthcoming collection entitled “Copyright’s Republic: Copyright for the Last … Continue reading “Copyright’s Republic: Promoting an Independent and Professional Class of Creators and Creative Businesses”

Copyright’s Republic: Copyright for the Last and the Next 225 Years

By Mark Schultz and Devlin Hartline This past Sunday marked the 225th anniversary of the first U.S. Copyright Act. As we move well into the twenty-first century, a claim that copyright no longer “works” in the “digital age” has become commonplace – so commonplace, in fact, that it’s arguably the dominant cliché in modern copyright … Continue reading “Copyright’s Republic: Copyright for the Last and the Next 225 Years”