Professor Ross E. Davies on the “Ebb and Flow in Safe Harbors”

CPIP has published a new policy brief by Professor Ross E. Davies entitled Ebb and Flow in Safe Harbors: Some Exemplary Experiences Under One Old Statute and One New. Prof. Davies teaches administrative law, civil procedure, comparative criminal law, contracts, employment discrimination, legal history, legal profession, and torts at George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law … Continue reading “Professor Ross E. Davies on the “Ebb and Flow in Safe Harbors””

Senate IP Subcommittee Hearing Addresses Intersection of DMCA and Fair Use

The following post comes from Yumi Oda, an LLM Candidate at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Yumi Oda As part of its year-long review of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), the Senate Subcommittee on Intellectual Property tackled yet another contentious issue in our copyright system—fair use. A virtual online hearing, … Continue reading “Senate IP Subcommittee Hearing Addresses Intersection of DMCA and Fair Use”

Senate IP Subcommittee Hearing on DMCA Exposes Notice-and-Takedown Problems for Artists and Authors

The following post comes from Yumi Oda, an LLM Candidate at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Yumi Oda On June 2, the Senate Subcommittee on Intellectual Property held a virtual online hearing entitled Is the DMCA’s Notice-and-Takedown System Working in the 21st Century? The hearing focused on the effectiveness of the Section … Continue reading “Senate IP Subcommittee Hearing on DMCA Exposes Notice-and-Takedown Problems for Artists and Authors”

Scalia Law Students and CPIP Scholars Make an Impact in Copyright Office Section 512 Study

The U.S. Copyright Office released its long-awaited report on Section 512 of Title 17 late last week. The Report is the culmination of more than four years of study by the Office of the safe harbor provisions for online service provider (OSP) liability in the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 (DMCA). Fortuitously, the study … Continue reading “Scalia Law Students and CPIP Scholars Make an Impact in Copyright Office Section 512 Study”

Twenty Years Later, DMCA More Broken Than Ever

With Section 512 of the DMCA, Congress sought to “preserve[] strong incentives for service providers and copyright owners to cooperate to detect and deal with copyright infringements that take place in the digital networked environment.”[1] Given the symbiotic relationship between copyright owners and service providers, Congress meant to establish an online ecosystem where both would … Continue reading “Twenty Years Later, DMCA More Broken Than Ever”

How the Supreme Court Made it Harder for Copyright Owners to Protect Their Rights—And Why Congress Should Fix It

Earlier this week, the Supreme Court handed down its decision in Fourth Estate v. Wall-Street.com, a case examining the registration precondition to filing a suit for copyright infringement in the federal district courts. While I agree with the Court’s exegesis of the statute at issue, it’s worth noting how the Court’s construction leaves many, if … Continue reading “How the Supreme Court Made it Harder for Copyright Owners to Protect Their Rights—And Why Congress Should Fix It”

Another Huge Setback in CloudFlare’s Quixotic Campaign to Protect Pirate Sites

Last August, I wrote about CloudFlare’s “desperate new strategy” to protect MP3Skull, a notorious pirate site that was sued by various recording companies for copyright infringement. CloudFlare offers content delivery networking, web optimization, and other performance services for websites. The plaintiffs easily obtained a permanent injunction against MP3Skull when it didn’t even bother to respond … Continue reading “Another Huge Setback in CloudFlare’s Quixotic Campaign to Protect Pirate Sites”

Librarians’ Contradictory Letter Reveals an Alarming Ignorance of the Copyright System

On December 14th, a group of librarians sent a letter to Congress explaining why they believe the Copyright Office should remain under the control of the Library of Congress. Written by University of Virginia Library’s Brandon Butler, the letter is a self-contradicting and uninformed response to recent recommendations on reform of the Copyright Office offered … Continue reading “Librarians’ Contradictory Letter Reveals an Alarming Ignorance of the Copyright System”

European Union Draws a Line on Infringing Hyperlinks

Last week, the European Court of Justice—the judicial authority of the European Union—issued an anticipated decision in the Sanoma hyperlinking case, declaring that commercial linking with knowledge of unauthorized content constitutes copyright infringement. The opinion comes after years of similar cases in Europe stirred debate over whether linking to pirated works was a ‘communication to the … Continue reading “European Union Draws a Line on Infringing Hyperlinks”

Despite What You Hear, Notice and Takedown is Failing Creators and Copyright Owners

In a recent op-ed in the LA Times, Professors Chris Sprigman and Mark Lemley praise the notice and takedown provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) as “a bit of copyright law worth saving.” They argue that Section 512 of the DMCA continues to serve its purpose of balancing the rights of copyright owners … Continue reading “Despite What You Hear, Notice and Takedown is Failing Creators and Copyright Owners”