Another Huge Setback in CloudFlare’s Quixotic Campaign to Protect Pirate Sites

Last August, I wrote about CloudFlare’s “desperate new strategy” to protect MP3Skull, a notorious pirate site that was sued by various recording companies for copyright infringement. CloudFlare offers content delivery networking, web optimization, and other performance services for websites. The plaintiffs easily obtained a permanent injunction against MP3Skull when it didn’t even bother to respond … Continue reading “Another Huge Setback in CloudFlare’s Quixotic Campaign to Protect Pirate Sites”

Librarians’ Contradictory Letter Reveals an Alarming Ignorance of the Copyright System

On December 14th, a group of librarians sent a letter to Congress explaining why they believe the Copyright Office should remain under the control of the Library of Congress. Written by University of Virginia Library’s Brandon Butler, the letter is a self-contradicting and uninformed response to recent recommendations on reform of the Copyright Office offered … Continue reading “Librarians’ Contradictory Letter Reveals an Alarming Ignorance of the Copyright System”

European Union Draws a Line on Infringing Hyperlinks

Last week, the European Court of Justice—the judicial authority of the European Union—issued an anticipated decision in the Sanoma hyperlinking case, declaring that commercial linking with knowledge of unauthorized content constitutes copyright infringement. The opinion comes after years of similar cases in Europe stirred debate over whether linking to pirated works was a ‘communication to the … Continue reading “European Union Draws a Line on Infringing Hyperlinks”

Despite What You Hear, Notice and Takedown is Failing Creators and Copyright Owners

In a recent op-ed in the LA Times, Professors Chris Sprigman and Mark Lemley praise the notice and takedown provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) as “a bit of copyright law worth saving.” They argue that Section 512 of the DMCA continues to serve its purpose of balancing the rights of copyright owners … Continue reading “Despite What You Hear, Notice and Takedown is Failing Creators and Copyright Owners”

CloudFlare's Desperate New Strategy to Protect Pirate Sites

San Francisco-based CloudFlare has earned a somewhat dubious reputation in the online world. Website owners can set up CloudFlare in just a few minutes, gaining the performance, security, and privacy benefits the service provides. Traffic routed through CloudFlare’s global content delivery network is cached for faster delivery times and protected from numerous online threats. Pirate … Continue reading “CloudFlare's Desperate New Strategy to Protect Pirate Sites”

Three Years Later, DMCA Still Just as Broken

By Matthew Barblan & Kevin Madigan In 2013, CPIP published a policy brief by Professor Bruce Boyden exposing the DMCA notice and takedown system as outdated and in need of reform. The Failure of the DMCA Notice and Takedown System explained that while Section 512 of the DMCA was intended as a way for copyright … Continue reading “Three Years Later, DMCA Still Just as Broken”

Second Circuit Deepens Red Flag Knowledge Circuit Split in Vimeo

The Second Circuit’s recent opinion in Capitol Records v. Vimeo is, to put it mildly, pretty bad. From its convoluted reasoning that copyrights under state law for pre-1972 sound recordings are limited by the DMCA safe harbors, despite the explicit statement in Section 301(c) that “rights or remedies” under state law “shall not be annulled … Continue reading “Second Circuit Deepens Red Flag Knowledge Circuit Split in Vimeo”

Capitol Records v. Vimeo: Courts Should Stop Coddling Bad Actors in Copyright Cases

Here’s a brief excerpt of my new post that was published on IPWatchdog: Here’s where we are after Capitol Records v. Vimeo: A service provider can encourage its users to infringe on a massive scale, and so long as the infringement it encourages isn’t the specific infringement it gets sued for, it wins on the … Continue reading “Capitol Records v. Vimeo: Courts Should Stop Coddling Bad Actors in Copyright Cases”

Copyright Policy Should Be Based On Facts, Not Rhetoric

Here’s a brief excerpt of a post by Kevin Madigan & Devlin Hartline that was published on IPWatchdog. After nearly twenty years with the DMCA, the Copyright Office has launched a new study to examine the impact and effectiveness of this system, and voices on both sides of the debate have filed comments expressing their … Continue reading “Copyright Policy Should Be Based On Facts, Not Rhetoric”

Separating Fact from Fiction in the Notice and Takedown Debate

By Kevin Madigan & Devlin Hartline With the Copyright Office undertaking a new study to evaluate the impact and effectiveness of the Section 512 safe harbor provisions, there’s been much discussion about how well the DMCA’s notice and takedown system is working for copyright owners, service providers, and users. While hearing from a variety of … Continue reading “Separating Fact from Fiction in the Notice and Takedown Debate”