CPIP’s Sandra Aistars Joins Artomatic Panel on Copyright Protection for Visual Artists

The following post comes from Liz Velander, a recent graduate of Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Liz Velander As part of its ongoing series about the copyright licensing process, Artomatic hosted a virtual panel for visual artists last week to discuss how to protect their creative works. The panel focused on … Continue reading “CPIP’s Sandra Aistars Joins Artomatic Panel on Copyright Protection for Visual Artists”

Senate IP Subcommittee Hearing Addresses Intersection of DMCA and Fair Use

The following post comes from Yumi Oda, an LLM Candidate at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Yumi Oda As part of its year-long review of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), the Senate Subcommittee on Intellectual Property tackled yet another contentious issue in our copyright system—fair use. A virtual online hearing, … Continue reading “Senate IP Subcommittee Hearing Addresses Intersection of DMCA and Fair Use”

Copyright Office Questions Legality of Internet Archive’s National Emergency Library

On March 24, the Internet Archive (Archive) unveiled what it called the “National Emergency Library” (NEL) in order to “address our unprecedented global and immediate need for access to reading and research materials.” The announcement specified that Archive would suspend the waitlist for 1.4 million books in its unlicensed “lending library” until at least June … Continue reading “Copyright Office Questions Legality of Internet Archive’s National Emergency Library”

Publishers v. Audible: An Army of Red Herrings

Audible has now filed its response to the publishers’ request for a preliminary injunction—twice. It filed the exact same brief to argue that it shouldn’t be preliminarily enjoined (Dkt. 34) and to argue that the complaint should be dismissed for failure to state a claim (Dkt. 41). Unfortunately for Audible, the repetition of fallacious arguments … Continue reading “Publishers v. Audible: An Army of Red Herrings”

Audible’s Planned Caption Service is Not Fair Use

Late last month, a group of publishers filed a complaint against Audible in the Southern District of New York asking the court to enjoin the audiobook distributor’s launch of a new audio-to-text transcription service. Although Audible has yet to file a response, a statement from the company—a subsidiary of Amazon since 2008—hints at a fair … Continue reading “Audible’s Planned Caption Service is Not Fair Use”

Arts & Entertainment Advocacy Clinic Students File Amicus Brief in Brammer v. Violent Hues

By Rachelle Mortimer & Grant Ossler* The Arts & Entertainment Advocacy Clinic at Antonin Scalia Law School recently filed an amicus brief in the Brammer v. Violent Hues case that is on appeal in the Fourth Circuit. The Clinic provides a unique opportunity for students interested in intellectual property and entertainment law. Each semester, students … Continue reading “Arts & Entertainment Advocacy Clinic Students File Amicus Brief in Brammer v. Violent Hues”

CPIP’s Sandra Aistars & Scalia Law Alumnae Urge Federal Circuit to Protect Creators and Rein In Fair Use in Oracle v. Google

On February 17, 2017, CPIP Senior Scholar Sandra Aistars filed an amicus brief in Oracle v. Google, a copyright case currently before the Federal Circuit. Prof. Aistars worked in conjunction with Scalia Law alumnae Antigone Peyton and Jennifer Aktins of Cloudigy Law and third-year law student Rebecca Cusey to file the brief on behalf of … Continue reading “CPIP’s Sandra Aistars & Scalia Law Alumnae Urge Federal Circuit to Protect Creators and Rein In Fair Use in Oracle v. Google”

Shaping Fair Use to Promote Fair Markets

How does fair use policy in copyright law affect markets for the production and distribution of creative works? As we come to the end of Fair Use Week, it’s a good time to highlight a report by the Phoenix Center for Advanced Legal and Economic Public Policy Studies, titled “Fair Use in the Digital Age,” … Continue reading “Shaping Fair Use to Promote Fair Markets”

Oracle v. Google: Expansive Fair Use Harms Creators

The following post comes from Rebecca Cusey, a third-year law student at Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University, and a movie critic at The Federalist. By Rebecca Cusey The fair use doctrine has expanded far beyond its purpose, according to an amicus brief filed this past Friday on behalf of 13 law professors in … Continue reading “Oracle v. Google: Expansive Fair Use Harms Creators”

Second Circuit Brings Some Sanity Back to Transformative Fair Use

The Second Circuit handed down an opinion in TCA Television v. McCollum earlier this week holding that a play’s inclusion of Abbott and Costello’s famous “Who’s on First?” routine was not transformative fair use. Given how expansive transformativeness has become lately, especially in the Second Circuit, the opinion is somewhat surprising. What’s more, it’s not … Continue reading “Second Circuit Brings Some Sanity Back to Transformative Fair Use”