Publishers v. Audible: VCRs and DVRs to the Rescue?

On August 23, a group of publishers, including Penguin Random House, HarperCollins, and Simon & Schuster, sued Audible for copyright infringement. Audible, which is a subsidiary of Amazon, sells and produces audiobooks, and it planned to launch a new speech-to-text feature on September 10. The feature, dubbed Audible Captions, would automatically convert the licensed audio … Continue reading “Publishers v. Audible: VCRs and DVRs to the Rescue?”

Twenty Years Later, DMCA More Broken Than Ever

With Section 512 of the DMCA, Congress sought to “preserve[] strong incentives for service providers and copyright owners to cooperate to detect and deal with copyright infringements that take place in the digital networked environment.”[1] Given the symbiotic relationship between copyright owners and service providers, Congress meant to establish an online ecosystem where both would … Continue reading “Twenty Years Later, DMCA More Broken Than Ever”

How the Supreme Court Made it Harder for Copyright Owners to Protect Their Rights—And Why Congress Should Fix It

Earlier this week, the Supreme Court handed down its decision in Fourth Estate v. Wall-Street.com, a case examining the registration precondition to filing a suit for copyright infringement in the federal district courts. While I agree with the Court’s exegesis of the statute at issue, it’s worth noting how the Court’s construction leaves many, if … Continue reading “How the Supreme Court Made it Harder for Copyright Owners to Protect Their Rights—And Why Congress Should Fix It”

Explaining Efficient Infringement

By Adam Mossoff & Bhamati Viswanathan In a recent New York Times op-ed, “The Patent Troll Smokescreen,” Joe Nocera used in print for the first time the term, “efficient infringement.” This pithy phrase quickly gained currency if only because it captures a well-known phenomenon that has been impossible to describe in even a single sentence. … Continue reading “Explaining Efficient Infringement”

CPIP Founders File Amicus Brief on Behalf of 11 Law Professors in Converse v. ITC

CPIP Founders Adam Mossoff & Mark Schultz filed an amicus brief today on behalf of 11 law professors in Converse v. International Trade Commission, a trademark case currently before the Federal Circuit. In late-2014, Converse filed a complaint with the International Trade Commission alleging that more than thirty companies, including Skechers, Walmart, New Balance, and … Continue reading “CPIP Founders File Amicus Brief on Behalf of 11 Law Professors in Converse v. ITC”

Criminal Copyright Infringement is Crime of "Moral Turpitude"

Cross-posted from the Law Theories blog. This past Friday, the Board of Immigration Appeals held that criminal copyright infringement constitutes a “crime involving moral turpitude” under immigration law. The Board reasoned that criminal copyright infringement is inherently immoral because it involves the willful theft of property and causes harm to both the copyright owner and … Continue reading “Criminal Copyright Infringement is Crime of "Moral Turpitude"”