The PTAB’s Regulatory Overreach and How it Cripples the Innovation Economy

On August 14, 2017, the Regulatory Transparency Project of the Federalist Society published a new white paper, Crippling the Innovation Economy: Regulatory Overreach at the Patent Office. This white paper examines how an administrative tribunal created in 2011—the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB)—has become “a prime example regulatory overreach.” Several CPIP scholars are members … Continue reading “The PTAB’s Regulatory Overreach and How it Cripples the Innovation Economy”

CPIP Founders File Amicus Brief on Behalf of 11 Law Professors in Converse v. ITC

CPIP Founders Adam Mossoff & Mark Schultz filed an amicus brief today on behalf of 11 law professors in Converse v. International Trade Commission, a trademark case currently before the Federal Circuit. In late-2014, Converse filed a complaint with the International Trade Commission alleging that more than thirty companies, including Skechers, Walmart, New Balance, and … Continue reading “CPIP Founders File Amicus Brief on Behalf of 11 Law Professors in Converse v. ITC”

How IP Helps Individuals

This is the second in a series of posts summarizing CPIP’s 2016 Fall Conference, “Intellectual Property and Global Prosperity.” The Conference was held at Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University on October 6-7, 2016. Videos of the conference panels and keynote address, as well as other materials, are available on the conference website. The … Continue reading “How IP Helps Individuals”

New CPIP Report: The Global Patent Pendency Problem

Why are some of the biggest fights about patent policy almost pointless in some places? Because in many countries, including some of the world’s most important emerging economies, it takes so long to get patents that the rights have little meaning. The Center for the Protection of Intellectual Property (CPIP) released a report today entitled The Long … Continue reading “New CPIP Report: The Global Patent Pendency Problem”

CPIP Scholars File Amicus Brief in Trading Technologies v. CQG

Earlier this month, CPIP Senior Scholar Adam Mossoff penned an amicus brief in Trading Technologies v. CQG, currently on appeal to the Federal Circuit. The brief was joined by nine other IP scholars, including CPIP Senior Scholars Mark Schultz and Kristen Osenga. The amici argue that Trading Technologies’ graphical user interface (GUI) constitutes patentable subject … Continue reading “CPIP Scholars File Amicus Brief in Trading Technologies v. CQG”

Principles and Priorities to Guide Congress’s Ongoing Copyright Review

Last week, CPIP published a new white paper, Copyright Principles and Priorities to Foster a Creative Digital Marketplace, by Sandra Aistars, Mark Schultz, and myself, which draws from the testimonies and scholarly writings of CPIP Senior Scholars in order to guide Congress as it continues its comprehensive review of the Copyright Act. The white paper … Continue reading “Principles and Priorities to Guide Congress’s Ongoing Copyright Review”

Debunking Myths About the Proposed Federal Trade Secrets Act

By Mark Schultz Today, CPIP is proud to release a paper authored by the nation’s preeminent expert on trade secret law, James Pooley. Mr. Pooley’s paper explains the arguments in favor of the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2015 (“DTSA”), which is currently being considered by Congress. To download the paper, please click here. The … Continue reading “Debunking Myths About the Proposed Federal Trade Secrets Act”

Copyright’s Republic: Promoting an Independent and Professional Class of Creators and Creative Businesses

By Mark Schultz and Devlin Hartline The following essay is the first in a series of CPIP essays celebrating the 225th anniversary of the Copyright Act by recognizing the rich purposes, benefits, and contributions of copyright. This series of essays will be published together in a forthcoming collection entitled “Copyright’s Republic: Copyright for the Last … Continue reading “Copyright’s Republic: Promoting an Independent and Professional Class of Creators and Creative Businesses”

Copyright’s Republic: Copyright for the Last and the Next 225 Years

By Mark Schultz and Devlin Hartline This past Sunday marked the 225th anniversary of the first U.S. Copyright Act. As we move well into the twenty-first century, a claim that copyright no longer “works” in the “digital age” has become commonplace – so commonplace, in fact, that it’s arguably the dominant cliché in modern copyright … Continue reading “Copyright’s Republic: Copyright for the Last and the Next 225 Years”