CPIP Co-Founder Testifies at House Judiciary Committee Hearing on IP

CPIP co-founder Adam Mossoff testified on June 13 before the House Judiciary Committee’s subcommittee on the Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet.  He and other witnesses testified about the impact of the Supreme Courts recent decision in TC Heartland LLC v. Kraft Foods Group Brands LLC on innovators and the possibility of future changes to … Continue reading “CPIP Co-Founder Testifies at House Judiciary Committee Hearing on IP”

Lobbyists Continue to Invoke Discredited Junk Science to Push Patent Legislation

It seems no matter how many times the mole gets whacked, it keeps popping back up. The latest incarnation of this problem is a recent op-ed by Katie Johnson of the National Association of Realtors, which relies on a long since discredited study about the state of patent litigation in the United States.  She goes … Continue reading “Lobbyists Continue to Invoke Discredited Junk Science to Push Patent Legislation”

CPIP Scholars Ask Supreme Court to Resist Call to Restrict Venue Choices for Patent Owners

On March 8, 2017, CPIP Scholars Adam Mossoff, Devlin Hartline, Chris Holman, Sean O’Connor, Kristen Osenga, & Mark Schultz joined an amicus brief in TC Heartland v. Kraft Foods. CPIP Scholars worked with USD Law’s Ted Sichelman to organize, write, and file the brief. The case focuses on whether patent owners may sue corporate defendants … Continue reading “CPIP Scholars Ask Supreme Court to Resist Call to Restrict Venue Choices for Patent Owners”

Law Professors & Economists Urge Caution on VENUE Act in Letter to Congress

Today, 28 law professors, economists, and political scientists from across the nation submitted a letter to Congress expressing serious concerns about the recent push for sweeping changes to patent litigation venue rules, such as those proposed in the VENUE Act. The letter is copied below, and it can be downloaded here: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2816062 Although proponents for … Continue reading “Law Professors & Economists Urge Caution on VENUE Act in Letter to Congress”

Do As I Say, Not As I Do: Google’s Patent Transparency Hypocrisy

It is common today to hear that it’s simply impossible to search a field of technology to determine whether patents are valid or if there’s even freedom to operate at all. We hear this complaint about the lack of transparency in finding “prior art” in both the patent application process and about existing patents. The … Continue reading “Do As I Say, Not As I Do: Google’s Patent Transparency Hypocrisy”

Changes to Patent Venue Rules Risk Collateral Damage to Innovators

Advocates for changing the patent venue rules, which dictate where patent owners can sue alleged infringers, have been arguing that their remedy will cure the supposed disease of abusive “trolls” filing suit after suit in the Eastern District of Texas. This is certainly true, but it’s only true in the sense that cyanide cures the … Continue reading “Changes to Patent Venue Rules Risk Collateral Damage to Innovators”

Patent Licensing and Secondary Markets in the Nineteenth Century

The following post comes from CPIP Programs and Research Associate Terrica Carrington, a rising 3L at George Mason University School of Law, and Devlin Hartline, Assistant Director at CPIP. They review a paper from CPIP’s 2014 Fall Conference, Common Ground: How Intellectual Property Unites Creators and Innovators, that was recently published in the George Mason … Continue reading “Patent Licensing and Secondary Markets in the Nineteenth Century”

How Rhetorical Epithets Have Led the FTC Astray in its Study of Patent Licensing Firms

We’ve all heard the narrative about patent licensing firms, often referred to pejoratively as “patent trolls.” These patent owners, who choose to license their innovations rather than build them, are the supposed poster-children of a “broken” patent system. It’s as if commercializing one’s property, just like a landlord leases his land for another to use, … Continue reading “How Rhetorical Epithets Have Led the FTC Astray in its Study of Patent Licensing Firms”

Unintended Consequences of “Patent Reform”: The Customer Suit Exception

In the last two weeks, the House and Senate Judiciary Committees marked up wide-ranging patent legislation ostensibly aimed at combating frivolous litigation by so-called “patent trolls.” But while the stated purpose of the House and Senate bills—H.R. 9 (the “Innovation Act”) and S. 1137 (the “PATENT Act”), respectively—is to combat abusive litigation, a closer look … Continue reading “Unintended Consequences of “Patent Reform”: The Customer Suit Exception”