No Consensus That Broad Patent ‘Reform’ is Necessary or Helpful

Here’s a brief excerpt of an op-ed by Adam Mossoff & Devlin Hartline that was published in The Hill: Two recent op-eds published in The Hill argue that broad patent legislation—misleadingly labeled “reform”—is needed because the U.S. patent system is fundamentally broken. In the first, Timothy Lee contends that opponents “cannot with a straight face” … Continue reading “No Consensus That Broad Patent ‘Reform’ is Necessary or Helpful”

Jennifer Lawrence Movie “Joy” Highlights the Need for Patent Protection

The following guest post comes from Rebecca Cusey, a second year law student at George Mason University School of Law and a movie critic at The Federalist. By Rebecca Cusey There are two patents in the movie “Joy”: the one the titular character failed to get and the one for which she is willing to … Continue reading “Jennifer Lawrence Movie “Joy” Highlights the Need for Patent Protection”

Intellectual Property, Innovation and Economic Growth: Mercatus Gets it Wrong

By Mark Schultz & Adam Mossoff A handful of increasingly noisy critics of intellectual property (IP) have emerged within free market organizations. Both the emergence and vehemence of this group has surprised most observers, since free market advocates generally support property rights. It’s true that there has long been a strain of IP skepticism among … Continue reading “Intellectual Property, Innovation and Economic Growth: Mercatus Gets it Wrong”

The History of Patent Licensing and Secondary Markets in Patents: An Antidote to False Rhetoric

The patent licensing business model is a flashpoint of controversy in the patent policy debates. Individuals and firms that specialize in licensing patented innovation – and companies that purchase patents in order to license them – have come under attack by the President, members of Congress, companies, lobbying groups, and others. On December 6, 2013, … Continue reading “The History of Patent Licensing and Secondary Markets in Patents: An Antidote to False Rhetoric”

The SHIELD Act: When Bad Economic Studies Make Bad Laws

[Cross-Posted at Truth on the Market on March 15, 2013] Earlier this month, Representatives Peter DeFazio and Jason Chaffetz picked up the gauntlet from President Obama’s comments on February 14 at a Google-sponsored Internet Q&A on Google+ that “our efforts at patent reform only went about halfway to where we need to go” and that … Continue reading “The SHIELD Act: When Bad Economic Studies Make Bad Laws”

Scratching my Head Over the SHIELD Act

By Michael Risch [The following is a blog posting by Michael Risch, a patent law scholar at Villanova Law School, that he originally posted on March 10, 2013 at the law professor group blog, Madisonian.net, where Professor Risch regularly blogs.  Professor Risch kindly gave us permission to repost his blog posting here.] Scratching my Head Over the … Continue reading “Scratching my Head Over the SHIELD Act”

Patented Innovation and Patent Wars: Some Historical Perspective

[This was originally posted at IBM’s A Smarter Planet Blog on January 11, 2013.] The America Invents Act (AIA) was signed into law in September 2011, and it is rightly recognized as “the most significant reform of the U.S. patent system since 1836.”  The AIA’s provisions are not even fully implemented yet — its ink … Continue reading “Patented Innovation and Patent Wars: Some Historical Perspective”