CPIP Scholars Join Comments to FTC on How Antitrust Overreach is Threatening Healthcare Innovation

On December 21, 2018, CPIP Senior Scholars Adam Mossoff and Kristen Osenga joined former Federal Circuit Chief Judge Randall Rader and SIU Law’s Mark Schultz in comments submitted to the FTC as part of its ongoing Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century Hearings. Through the hearings, the FTC is examining whether recent economic … Continue reading “CPIP Scholars Join Comments to FTC on How Antitrust Overreach is Threatening Healthcare Innovation”

Recognizing the Limits of Government Procurement in the Pharmaceutical Industries

While recent headlines claim that rising drug prices can be easily addressed through government intervention, the procedures involved with government use of patented technologies are complex and often misunderstood. In addition to owning and practicing a vast portfolio of patents, the government has the power to procure and use patented technologies—including pharmaceutical medicines—in limited circumstances … Continue reading “Recognizing the Limits of Government Procurement in the Pharmaceutical Industries”

A Cure Worse Than the Disease? Proposed Changes to European Patent Law are Threatening Pharmaceutical Innovation

Innovation is all around us. We love and appreciate the latest video games, software apps, and smartphones. We await the integration of self-driving cars and other forms of artificial intelligence. Beyond the gadgets and luxuries we think we can’t live without, there are even more essential products that affect the lives of millions around the … Continue reading “A Cure Worse Than the Disease? Proposed Changes to European Patent Law are Threatening Pharmaceutical Innovation”

Proposal for Drug Price Controls is Legally Unprecedented and Threatens Medical Innovation

By Adam Mossoff, Sean O’Connor, & Evan Moore* The price of the miracle drugs everyone uses today is cause for concern among people today. The President has commented on it. Some academics, lawyers, and policymakers have routinely called for the government to “do something” to lower prices. The high prices are unsurprising: cutting-edge medical treatments are … Continue reading “Proposal for Drug Price Controls is Legally Unprecedented and Threatens Medical Innovation”

New CPIP Policy Brief: An Unwise Move to Discriminate Against Pharmaceutical Patents

CPIP has published a new policy brief entitled An Unwise Move to Discriminate Against Pharmaceutical Patents: Responding to the UN’s Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Patent Examination. The brief, written by CPIP Senior Scholar and UMKC Professor of Law Chris Holman, analyzes the UN’s recent Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Patent Examination, which are influential in the policy debates … Continue reading “New CPIP Policy Brief: An Unwise Move to Discriminate Against Pharmaceutical Patents”

CPIP Scholars Examine the Flaws in the Term “Evergreening”

In their new paper, Evergreening of Pharmaceutical Exclusivity: Sorting Fact from Misunderstanding and Fiction, Professors Kristina Acri née Lybecker and Mark Schultz, along with CPIP John F. Witherspoon Legal Fellow David Lund, analyze how the term “evergreening” is used in the context of pharmaceuticals. After sorting through the vagaries and rhetorical excesses that restrict meaningful … Continue reading “CPIP Scholars Examine the Flaws in the Term “Evergreening””

The Common Economic Case for Patents and Copyrights

This is the second in a series of posts summarizing CPIP’s 2014 Fall Conference, “Common Ground: How Intellectual Property Unites Creators and Innovators.” The Conference was held at George Mason University School of Law on October 9-10, 2014.  Videos of the conference panels and keynote will be available soon. The opening panel of CPIP’s 2014 … Continue reading “The Common Economic Case for Patents and Copyrights”