Copyright Office Questions Legality of Internet Archive’s National Emergency Library

On March 24, the Internet Archive (Archive) unveiled what it called the “National Emergency Library” (NEL) in order to “address our unprecedented global and immediate need for access to reading and research materials.” The announcement specified that Archive would suspend the waitlist for 1.4 million books in its unlicensed “lending library” until at least June … Continue reading “Copyright Office Questions Legality of Internet Archive’s National Emergency Library”

IP Industries Step Up in This Time of Crisis

The global COVID-19 pandemic has challenged multiple aspects of modern society in a short time. Health and public safety, education, commerce, research, arts, and even basic government functions have had to change dramatically in the space of a couple months. Some good news in all this is the response of many companies in the intellectual … Continue reading “IP Industries Step Up in This Time of Crisis”

Publishers v. Audible: An Army of Red Herrings

Audible has now filed its response to the publishers’ request for a preliminary injunction—twice. It filed the exact same brief to argue that it shouldn’t be preliminarily enjoined (Dkt. 34) and to argue that the complaint should be dismissed for failure to state a claim (Dkt. 41). Unfortunately for Audible, the repetition of fallacious arguments … Continue reading “Publishers v. Audible: An Army of Red Herrings”

Audible’s Planned Caption Service is Not Fair Use

Late last month, a group of publishers filed a complaint against Audible in the Southern District of New York asking the court to enjoin the audiobook distributor’s launch of a new audio-to-text transcription service. Although Audible has yet to file a response, a statement from the company—a subsidiary of Amazon since 2008—hints at a fair … Continue reading “Audible’s Planned Caption Service is Not Fair Use”

Publishers v. Audible: VCRs and DVRs to the Rescue?

On August 23, a group of publishers, including Penguin Random House, HarperCollins, and Simon & Schuster, sued Audible for copyright infringement. Audible, which is a subsidiary of Amazon, sells and produces audiobooks, and it planned to launch a new speech-to-text feature on September 10. The feature, dubbed Audible Captions, would automatically convert the licensed audio … Continue reading “Publishers v. Audible: VCRs and DVRs to the Rescue?”

New CPIP Policy Brief: Open-Access Mandates and the Seductively False Promise of “Free”

CPIP has published a new policy brief entitled Open-Access Mandates and the Seductively False Promise of “Free.” The brief, written by CPIP Legal Fellow Bhamati Viswanathan and CPIP Director of Academic Programs & Senior Scholar Adam Mossoff, exposes the lack of evidence or justification for the proliferating legal mandates by federal agencies that coerce authors … Continue reading “New CPIP Policy Brief: Open-Access Mandates and the Seductively False Promise of “Free””